Convert 24 bit ICAO adr to flight ID, like 4ca4ec to RYR82SN

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fase
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Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:16 pm

Convert 24 bit ICAO adr to flight ID, like 4ca4ec to RYR82SN

Post by fase » Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:22 pm

Hi

I just got my rtl-sdr device a week ago and it works fine with dump1090 by Malcolm Robb.

With about 25% of the ICAO addresses I get, I does not get a flight "Identification".
Is there a database where I can map these ICAO-adr to flight Identification somewhere?

(I have search a lot, no cigar)

best regards

rtlsdrblog
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Re: Convert 24 bit ICAO adr to flight ID, like 4ca4ec to RYR

Post by rtlsdrblog » Wed Jan 04, 2017 5:33 am

You might look into the databases that PlanePlotter uses http://planeplotter.pbworks.com/w/page/ ... /Databases. They link to http://planebase.biz/ but unfortunately I don't think these databases are publicly available anymore.

Username
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Re: Convert 24 bit ICAO adr to flight ID, like 4ca4ec to RYR

Post by Username » Sun Jun 04, 2017 4:11 pm

24 bit ICAO adr to flight ID
The HEX show the Registration not the Callsign?!

snn47
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2016 11:00 pm

Some Mode S 24 bit adress background

Post by snn47 » Sun Jun 04, 2017 5:42 pm

The idea for the 24 Bit address was to assign each airframe an unique 24 Bit aircraft address for life.
The legacy SSR Mode A allowed only for 4096 addresses "Squawks" (4 octal numbers each 3 Bits) and required change of the Squawk during a flight, whenever the plane was handed over from one ATC control center to another, unless provisions were made to allow for a handover. That is why Mode Selective development was initiated by the FAA in the seventies. If you are interested in the many problems involved, you can find most R&D reports on the MIT's Lincoln Labs website.

For the operational use of the 24 Bit address you can read
ICAO 24-bit aircraft addresses and aircraft identification reporting
http://www.luftfartstilsynet.no/regelve ... le1282.ece

3 CORRECT SETTING OF AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION
either the ICAO three-letter designator for the aircraft operating agency followed by the flight identification
or
the ICAO three-letter designator for the aircraft operating agency followed by the flight identification is used.


The worldwide 24 Bit address allocation is explained here
ICAO Annex 10 Volume III Chapter 9. Aircraft Addressing System
Appendix to Chapter 9. A World-Wide Scheme for the Allocation, Assignment and Application of Aircraft Addresses
http://www.kloth.net/radio/icao24alloc. ... 4alloc.php

For registration of airframes you can read here
https://www.icao.int/Meetings/AMC/MA/NA ... a3wp05.pdf

Some information can be deduced because planes often fly repeatedly the same routes and times. However airlines may rent/use different airframes e.g. if an aircraft with more seats is needed, the regular airframe is not available, because it is stuck somewhere because (they did not depart before) airport was closed, aircraft is unavailable due to maintenance or .... That would cover only comercial aircraft.

While generating database is possible, getting it correct without access to Flight Plans and/or information from airlines would seem difficult to impossible to me. Given enought time a database could be generated correlating the many available sources of departure and arrival times of aircraft from airports, and detected 24 Bit addresses. Some Air Naviagtion Service Provider may provide a display of their RADAR coverage, they opt to have a certain time lag to meet safety concerns/security reasons.

If you should find out more on how the databases were generated, share it please with us.

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