Tagged: gnu radio

Podcasts: GNU Radio with Ben Hilburn + New Signals and Bits Episodes

The Scanner School Podcast has recently released a new episode featuring an interview with Ben Hilburn, President of the GNU Radio project. If you want to understand what GNU Radio is, and what role it plays in the SDR/radio world, then this is a good listen.

Ben Hilburn is the project lead for GNU Radio, the free and open software radio ecosystem.

GNU Radio works best in an Linux environment and can also run on the ever popular Raspberry PI.

Ben and I discuss what GNU Radio is, how people are using GNU Radio, and how easy it is to get started with this amazing piece of free software.

If you are looking to learn how the hardware inside of a radio makes it work, or maybe you already do…. GNU radio is a great resource for you

Ben himself has a new podcast of his own titled "Signals & Bits" and there are a number of episodes already out, including an interview with SignalsEverywhere YouTube channel host Harold Giddings, Manuel Uhm Director of Marketing at Xilinx who talks about SDR designs on FPGA chips, and most recently Daina Bouquin who talks about her project called "The Space Library" that is in collaboration with the LibreSpace Foundation.

Talks from GNU Radio Days 2019

GNU Radio Days 2019 was a workshop held back in June. Within the last week recordings of the talks have been uploaded to YouTube by the Software Defined Radio Academy channel. The talks cover a wide range of cutting edge SDR research topics and projects. Many of the presenters have also made use of RTL-SDR dongles, as well as other higher end SDRs in their research.

All the talks are combined into two 3 hour long videos from the morning and day sessions from day one. Day two also has two videos that consist of recordings from the tutorial sessions which make use of the PlutoSDR. Finally there is also the keynote speech from Marcus Müller where he dives into the internal workings of GNU Radio.

Below we list the talks with timestamps for the YouTube video. Short text abstracts for each of the talks can also be found in the conference book. We note that not all the abstracts appear to have been presented in the videos, so it may be worth checking out the book for missed talks about passive radar, a 60 GHz link, embedded GNU Radio on a PlutoSDR, an SDR 802.11 infrared transmission system, PHY-MAC layer prototyping in dense IoT networks and hacking the DSMx Drone RC protocol.

Continue reading

GNU Radio 3.8.0.0 Released – First Minor Release Version in Six Years

GNU Radio is an open source digital signal processing (DSP) toolkit which is often used to implement decoders, demodulators and various other SDR algorithms. Several SDR programs are based on GNU Radio code, and it is responsible for a lot of DSP development and knowledge within the SDR and radio community. It is compatible with almost all SDR devices, including the RTL-SDR.

Recently GNU Radio has been updated to version 3.8.0.0. The release is classed as the first "minor" release version in six years, as they are going from version 3.7 to 3.8. That doesn't mean there have been no changes for six years, it just means that over the last six years all releases have remained within the 3.7 version and they have mostly been bug fixes rather than larger changes like added features. Behind the scenes over the last six years developers have been working on these larger changes, and now is the time that they have been officially released.

Marcus Müller from GNU Radio writes:

Witness me!

Tonight, we release GNU Radio 3.8.0.0.

It’s the first minor release version since more than six years, not without pride this community stands to face the brightest future SDR on general purpose hardware ever had.

Since we’ve not been documenting changes in the shape of a Changelog for the whole of the development that happened since GNU Radio 3.7.0, I’m afraid that these release notes will be more of a GLTL;DR (git log too long; didn’t read) than a detailed account of what has changed.

What has not changed is the fact that GNU Radio is centered around a very simple truth:

Let the developers hack on DSP. Software interfaces are for humans, not the other way around.

And so, compared to the later 3.7 releases, nothing has fundamentally modified the way one develops signal processing systems with GNU Radio: You write blocks, and you combine blocks to be part of a larger signal processing flow graph.

With that as a success story, we of course have faced quite a bit of change in the systems we use to develop and in the people that develop GNU Radio. This has lead to several changes that weren’t compatible with 3.7.

The changelog is too long to quote here, but as a summary they have fixed bugs, updated dependencies to newer versions, enabled C++ code generation, changed XML to YAML, moved from QT4 to QT5 and removed a few stale projects. Some of these changes could break compatibility with older GNU Radio tutorials and programs. It also seems that unfortunately due to a lack of updates, support for the Funcube Dongle has been removed.

Signals and Bits A New SDR Podcast by the President of the GNU Radio Project

[Ben Hilburn] the president of the [GNU Radio Project] has recently started a new podcast called [Signals and Bits]. If you were unaware, GNU Radio is the defacto open source framework for implementing digital signal processing code. Without it, many SDR programs that we take for granted may have never been developed as it is responsible for a lot of community DSP knowledge and algorithm development.

This podcast is scheduled for a new release every Wednesday and will be composed in an interview style focusing on a multitude of topics from Software Defined Radio to Spectrum Enforcement, Radio Astronomy and so much more.

In the first episode Ben interviews Harold Giddings AKA Corrosive of [Signals Everywhere] where they discuss the state of Software-Defined radio and how he got started with radio communications having come from an IT/Computer Networking background.

Ben has already pre-recorded several episodes which will ensure great content is always just around the corner. Ben would love it if you could also send feedback his way over on the [Signals and Bits Twitter] page.

Ben Hilburn President of GNU Radio (Left), Harold Giddings AKA Corrosive of Signals Everywhere (Right)

Tracking Tagged Orangutans in the Bornean Jungle with Drones, GNU Radio and an Airspy Mini

Due to various human activities causing the environmental destruction of it's habitat, the Orangutan is now classed as a critically endangered species. In addition to being endangered, Orangutans face another problem in that they are often captured and sold as pets due to their intelligence and cuteness.

To combat these problems, NGOs, charities and rescue centers have been using RF tags on rehabilitated Orangutans that have released back into the wild. The RF tag regularly transmits a data-less pulse at VHF frequencies which is then typically tracked using direction finding equipment such as a directional Yagi antenna. The range is only approximately 200-400m. 

In order to try and alleviate the range issue Dirk Gorissen has been working on creating a drone based system that could detect the VHF transmission and create a heatmap of Orangutan positions. The first iteration of his system uses an RTL-SDR, Odroid and lightweight loop antenna. A simple Python script then monitors the spectrum and logs the drones current location, altitude, speed and heading when a pulse is detected. Tests confirmed that the signal was able to be detected from the sky, but unfortunately the drone was eventually crashed and lost before it could be properly used.

In his second try a few years later, Dirk used a larger drone and switched SDRs to an Airspy Mini with preamp. The pulse detection code was also improved by using GNU Radio to create a DSP algorithm combining peak detection, cross correlation with a known template of the signal, and a phase locked loop. Visualization and data transfer is achieved through react.js and a Flask web server running on the drones WiFi hotspot. This time with the new drone and system Dirk was able to successfully detect and locate several Orangutan's on various flights, despite noting that some RF tags appeared to be glitchy.

Orangutan Detected with Drone, Airspy Mini and GNU Radio.
Orangutan Detected with Drone, Airspy Mini and GNU Radio.
Drone used in the experiment
Drone used in the experiment

Podcast: The magic of Software Defined Radio with Ben Hilburn

Hanselminutes is a weekly podcast that aims to promote fresh technology and fresh voices to software developers. Last Friday they interviewed Ben Hilburn who is the project lead and president of the GNU Radio Foundation and Director of Engineering at DeepSig Inc who are working on combining deep learning with the signal processing. In the podcast Ben talks briefly about a broad range of topics like spectrum scarcity issues, different SDR hardware, basic SDR fundamental concepts, multipath, GPS, RF security, analogue vs digital and more. It is aimed at technical people who know little about SDR and radio.

EPISODE SUMMARY

Ben Hilburn is the Director of Engineering at DeepSig Inc., which is commercializing the fundamental research behind deep learning applied to wireless communications and signal processing. He also runs GNU Radio, the most widely used open-source signal processing toolkit in the world, serving as Project Lead and President of The GNU Radio Foundation. Ben talks to Scott about why Software Defined Radio is magical and they talk about how SDR can be used to teach STEM and solve interesting engineering problems.

EPISODE NOTES

Ben Hilburn is the Director of Engineering at DeepSig Inc., which is commercializing the fundamental research behind deep learning applied to wireless communications and signal processing. He also runs GNU Radio, the most widely used open-source signal processing toolkit in the world, serving as Project Lead and President of The GNU Radio Foundation. Ben talks to Scott about why Software Defined Radio is magical and they talk about how SDR can be used to teach STEM and solve interesting engineering problems.

More Talks from GNURadio Con 2018

Last week we posted about some videos of talks from the 2018 GNU Radio Conference which had been release on YouTube. This week a few more videos have been released and we display a small selection below. The full collection of videos can be found on their YouTube channel.

RF Ranging with LoRa Leveraging RTL-SDRs and GNU Radio

Wil Myrick discusses the use of RTL-SDRs and GNU Radio to create a low cost LoRa RF ranging prototype, to aid in the localization of IoT transmitters.

GRCon18 - RF Ranging with LoRa Leveraging RTL SDRs and GNU Radio

Using GNU Radio and Red Pitaya for Citizen Science

Robert W McGwier discusses the use of Red Pitaya SDRs and GNU Radio for use in citizen science ionosphere measurement experiments.

GRCon18 - Using GNU Radio and Red Pitaya for Citizen Science

SETI Breakthrough Listen

Steve Croft discusses the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project and how software defined radio is being used in the search.

GRCon18 - SETI Breakthrough Listen

Talks from the 2018 GNU Radio Conference

GNU Radio is a very powerful open source platform for implementing various digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. It is very commonly used with software defined radios like the RTL-SDR, as well as much higher end units. The community that uses GNU Radio is very large, and so every year they hold a conference that highlights some of the most interesting applications and developments related to GNU Radio. The 2018 GNU Radio conference was held in Las Vegas during September 2018. Recently they have uploaded the talks to YouTube, and below we're posting some of our favorites. The full list can be found on their YouTube channel.

Keynote Talk: SatNOGs

In this keynote talk Manolis Surligas discusses the SatNOGs project. SatNOGs is a non-profit organization creating an open source and volunteer based satellite ground station network.

GRCon18 - Keynote: SatNOGs

Open Source Radio Telescopes

John L. Makous discusses his work in creating low cost and home made horn antenna radio telescopes designed to receive the 21cm hydrogen line and other astronomical objects and phenomena. The idea is to provide a low cost solution and easy to build telescope to use in schools.

GRCon18 - Open Source Radio Telescopes

Enter the Electromagic Spectrum with the USRP

Nate Temple gives us an overview of several signals that have been decoded with GNU Radio flowgraphs.

GRCon18 - Enter the Electromagic Spectrum with the USRP

Software Defined Radar Remote Sensing and Space Physics

Juha Vierinen discusses using a USRP to measure propagation conditions with ionospheric chip sounders, and improvements to chirp sounders by using spread spectrum noise. He also discusses various other radar techniques and applications.

GRCon18 - Software Defined Radar Remote Sensing and Space Physics