Tagged: rtl-sdr

SignalsEverywhere: Decoding Inmarsat EGC and AERO ACARS

On his latest video Corrosive from the SignalsEverywhere YouTube channel discusses Inmarsat LES EGC and AERO ACARS decoding. Inmarsat is a satellite provider that has multiple geosynchronous satellites that can be received from almost anywhere in the world at around 1.5 GHz with an RTL-SDR and appropriate antenna + LNA. Inmarsat EGC and AERO are two channels on Inmarsat satellites that can easily be decoded.

The Enhanced Group Call (EGC) messages typically contain text information such as search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather and incident reports. AERO messages on the other hand are a form of satellite ACARS, and typically contain short messages from aircraft. More interestingly with a bit of work compiling audio decoders, it is also possible to listen in to AERO C-Channel conversations, which is an emergency phone call service available on some aircraft.

In his video Corrosive gives an overview and demonstration of EGC and AERO reception.

Inmarsat LES EGC and AERO ACARS Decoding

Reverse Engineering and Controlling a Wireless Doorbell with an RTL-SDR and Arduino

Thank you to Shreyas Ubale for submitting his blog post about reverse engineering a wireless doorbell, and then performing a replay attack. Shreyas had purchased a wireless doorbell set containing one button transmitter and two bell receivers. However, his situation required two transmitters, one for visitors at the door, and one to be used by family within his house.

In order to create a second transmitter he decided to reverse engineer the doorbells wireless signal, and use that information to create an Arduino based transmitter. His process involves first using an RTL-SDR to determine the transmission frequency, then using the rtl_433 software to capture the raw waveform which he then analyzes manually using Audacity. Once the binary string, length and pulse width is known he is able to program an Arduino connected to a 433 MHz transmitter to replicate the signal.

In future posts Shreyas hopes to explore other ways to transmit the signal, and eventually design a simple but configurable 433 MHz push button that supports RF, WiFi, and can support the IFTTT web service.

If you're interested, check out some of our previous posts that highlight many other successful reverse engineering experiments with RF devices and SDR.

Doorbell Signal Analysis in Audacity. Captured with an RTL-SDR.
Doorbell Signal Analysis in Audacity. Captured with an RTL-SDR.

ExtIO_RTLSDR# – Modified ExtIO for SDRUno/HDSDR with Direct Sampling Mode

Fixed RTL-SDR EXTIO for SDRUno.
Fixed RTL-SDR EXTIO for SDRUno.

Over on our forums user qrp has released a modified ExtIO that allows the direct sampling mode to work correctly in SDRUno. SDRUno is SDRplay's official software for their RSP line of software defined radios, but SDRUno can also work with ExtIO input dlls which allow other SDRs like the RTL-SDR to be used.

The commonly found RTL-SDR ExtIO however doesn't seem to work properly with direct sampling mode in SDRUno, so HF on RTL-SDR Blog V3 or other direct sampling modified RTL-SDR dongles is inaccessible. The new ExtIO fixes the direct sampling problem, and also enables a Remove DC algorithm to remove that center spike, which isn't an option in SDRUno.

To use the ExtIO simply extract the ExtIO_RTLSDR_u8.dll and rtlsdr.dll files from the zip file into a folder on your PC. Then from the Start Menu find the SDRUno (EXTIO) shortcut and run it. When it asks you, select the ExtIO_RTLSDR_u8.dll file. Note that you will probably need to use the older v1.22 SDRUno version as V1.31 doesn't appear to have an ExtIO version.

Tracking and Recovering A NWS Weather Balloon & Radiosonde with an RTL-SDR

Over on YouTube OLHZN High Altitude Balloons has posted a very entertaining video showing how to use an RTL-SDR and small grid dish antenna to track and recover a fallen weather balloon and its radiosonde. OLHZN writes:

The US National Weather Service (#NWS) launches over 200 weather balloons everyday carrying an LMS-6 #radiosonde / rawinsonde made by Lockheed Martin to an altitude of over 100,000 ft. and you can track & follow the flights from home and even find the landing site and pick them up! This is a fun #DIY project that you can do yourself from home and I'll show you how to do it here along with some tips so you can go find yourself a weather balloon & radiosonde!

How to track & recover a NWS weather balloon & radiosonde 🎈🎈 DIY

SignalsEverywhere: Common Modulations Tutorial Video

This week on the SignalsEverywhere YouTube channel, host Corrosive gives us a tutorial on common modulations that you'll see on your software defined radio. His tutorial covers Amplitude Modulation (AM), Frequency Modulation (FM), Single Side Band (SSB) and Conintuous Wave (CW) modulations. In the video he shows what they look like and how to select the correct mode and bandwidth settings in SDR#. Corrosive uses an Airspy in the video, but the same concepts are valid for any SDR, like the RTL-SDR.

If you're new to SDR then this is a great introductory video to watch and learn from.

AM FM SSB and CW | Common Modulation You'll See on SDR

An RTL-SDR and Pi 3 Based Ground Station for Simulated CubeSats

CubeSats are small and light satellites that can these days be built and launched into orbit by almost anyone with a small budget of roughly $40,000. They are a great way for schools and other organizations to get into a space based technology project. A "simulated" CubeSat is one that is not designed to be really launched into space, and is made from low cost hardware. The idea is that simulated CubeSats can be used as tools to help demystify the inner workings of satellites to the public and help CubeSat builders get experience and competence before building the real thing.

A Simulated CubeSat made from a Solar Panel board, Pi Zero, UPS and Tranceiver.
A Simulated CubeSat made from a Solar Panel board, Pi Zero, UPS and Transceiver.

A team from AMSAT have been working on creating open source CubeSat simulator hardware and software. In order to demonstrate the RF capabilities of the simulator a ground station simulator is also required. Recently the team have uploaded instructions on creating a Raspberry Pi and RTL-SDR based ground station.

If you're interested in the CubeSat simulator hardware itself, there was a presentation held back in 2018 that may be of interest to you. According to the presentation somewhere between 30% - 50% of CubeSats fail as soon as they're deployed, so building competence with simulated hardware is a good goal.

2018 AMSAT William A. Tynan W3XO Memorial Space Symposium - Saturday Sessions

Decoding FT8 with an RTL-SDR Blog V3 in Direct Sampling Mode

Over on YouTube user ModernHam has uploaded a useful tutorial showing how to use our RTL-SDR Blog V3 dongles for FT8 monitoring. The RTL-SDR Blog V3 has a built in direct sampling circuit which allows for reception of HF signals without the need for any upconverter. FT8 is an amateur radio weak signal digital communications mode which can be received all around the world even with low transmit power.

In his setup he uses SDR# and Virtual Audio Cable to pipe audio to the WSJT-X decoder. His video goes through all the steps and settings that need to be set and then shows a demo of some signals being received. ModernHam also has another video uploaded a few days earlier which is a more general introduction to FT8 decoding.

If you're interested we uploaded a tutorial last year that shows how to set up a Raspberry Pi 3 based FT8 decoding station with a V3 dongle.

Decoding FT8 with a RTL-SDR (Software defined Radio)

The RadioInstigator: A $150 Signals Intelligence Platform Consisting of a Raspberry Pi, RPiTX, 2.4 GHz Crazyradio and an RTL-SDR

Circle City Con is a yearly conference that focuses on information security talks. At this years conference Josh Conway presented an interesting talk titled "SigInt for the Masses Building and Using a Signals Intelligence Platform for Less than $150". Josh's talk introduces his "RadioInstigator" hardware which is a combination of a Raspberry Pi, CrazyRadio and an RTL-SDR all packaged into a 3D printed enclosure with LCD screen. The idea behind the RadioInstigator is to create a portable and low cost Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) device that can be used to investigate and manipulate the security of radio signals.

The RadioInstigator makes use of the RPiTX software which allows a Raspberry Pi to transmit an arbitrary radio signal from 5 kHz up to 1500 MHz without the use of any additional transmitting hardware - just connect an antenna directly to a GPIO pin. Connected to the Pi is a CrazyRadio, which is a nRF24LU1+ based radio that can be used to receive and transmit 2.4 GHz. And of course there is an RTL-SDR for receiving every other signal. Josh has made the plans for the RadioInstigator fully open source over on GitLab.

In his talk Josh introduces the RadioInstigator, then goes on to discuss other SDR hardware, antenna concepts and software installed on the RadioInstrigator like RPiTX, GNU Radio, Universal Radio Hacker, Salamandra, TempestSDR and more.

[First seen on Hackaday]

Track 3 07 SigInt for the Masses Building and Using a Signals Intelligence Platform for Less than 15