New Product: RTL-SDR Blog 1090 MHz ADS-B LNA

We're happy to announce the release of our new high performance low noise amplifier (LNA) for improving 1090 MHz ADS-B reception. The LNA uses a low noise figure high linearity two stage MGA-13116 amplifier chip and three stages of filtering to ensure that strong signals or interference will not overload either the amplifier or SDR dongle.

The LNA is currently only available from our Chinese warehouse, and costs US$24.95 including shipping. Please note that the price may increase slightly in the future, and that Amazon USA may not be stocked until March.

Click here to visit our store

An LNA can help improve ADS-B reception by reducing the noise figure of the system and by helping to overcome losses in the coax cable and/or any other components such as switches and connector in the signal path. To get the best performance from an LNA, the LNA needs to be positioned close to the antenna, before the coax to the radio.

The gain of the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA is 27 dB's at 1090 MHz, and out of band signals are reduced by at least 60 - 80 dB's. Attenuation in the broadcast FM band and below 800 MHz is actually closer to over 100 dB's. In the LNA signal path there is first a low insertion loss high pass filter that reduces the strength of any broadcast FM, TV, pager or other similar signals that are usually extremely strong. Then in between the first and second stage of the LNA is a SAW filter tuned for 1090 MHz. A second SAW filter sits on the output of the LNA. The result is that strong out of band signals are significantly blocked, yet the LNA remains effective at 1090 MHz with a low ~1 dB noise figure.

The LNA is also protected against ESD damage with a gas discharge tube and low capacitance ESD diode. But please always remember that your antenna must also be properly grounded to prevent ESD damage.

Please note that this LNA requires bias tee power to work. Bias tee power is when the DC power comes through the coax cable. The RTL-SDR V3 has bias tee power built into it and this can be activated in software. See the V3 users guide for information on how to activate it. Alternatively if you don't own a dongle with bias tee built in, then an external bias tee can be used and those can be found fairly cheaply on eBay. Finally, if you are confident with soldering SMT components, then there are also pads and a 0 Ohm resistor slot on the PCB to install an LDO and power the LNA directly.

In addition please remember that this is a high gain LNA. It is expected to be used at the antenna side, with some 3+ db loss expected on the coax. However, if desired, it can still be used on the receiver side. If used on the receiver side or with a low loss run of coax, you will need to tune the RF gain on the RTL-SDR dongle. By default most software sets the RF gain to maximum. We recommend turning the RTL-SDR RF gain down to about 32 dB if connecting it directly to the dongle, otherwise the high input power may overload the dongle causing poor performance.

Specification Summary:

  • Frequency: 1090 MHz
  • Gain: 27 dB @ 1090 MHz
  • Return Loss: -16 dB @ 1090 MHz (SWR = 1.377)
  • Noise Figure: ~1 dB
  • Out of band attenuation: More than 60 dB
  • ESD Protection: Dual with GDT and ESD Diode
  • Power: 3.3 - 5V via bias tee only, 150 mA current draw
  • Enclosure: Aluminum enclosure
  • Connectors: Two SMA Female (Male to Male adapter included)

Dimensions:

46.5 x 32 x 15.6 mm (not including the SMA).
Including the SMA the length is 69.8 mm.

Testing

We tested our new LNA against another ADS-B LNA with filter built in that is sold by another company and the FlightAware Prostick+ dongle in an environment with strong out of band signals such as pagers, broadcast FM, DVB-T and GSM signals. The results showed that the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA gathered the most ADS-B packets. In the tests both LNA's were connected on the receiver side to be fair to the FA dongle. Improved performance could be achieved by moving the LNA to the antenna side.

Other ADS-B LNA vs RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA Received Messages
FlightAware Prostick+ vs RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA Received Messages

Checking in SDR# for out of band signals also showed that the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA significantly reduces those strong out of band signals, whereas the others have trouble blocking them out. Below we show the results as well as some measurements.

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz
Other ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz
FlightAware Prostick+ @ 1090 MHz
RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM
Other ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM
FlightAware Protstick+ tuned to Broadcast FM
RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal
Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal
FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a DVB-T Signal
RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal
Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal
FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a GSM Signal
Gain Measurements
Return Loss
Simulated Gain/Attenuation
VNA Scan
RTL Blog ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz Other ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz FlightAware Prostick+ @ 1090 MHz RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM Other ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM FlightAware Protstick+ tuned to Broadcast FM RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a DVB-T Signal RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a GSM Signal Gain Measurements Return Loss Simulated Gain/Attenuation VNA Scan

Reviews

Tyson Power YouTube Review

Radio For Everyone Review

Conclusion

This RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA can significantly improve ADS-B reception, especially if you are in an environment with strong out of band signals. Even if you are not, the low noise figure design will improve reception regardless.

82 comments

Post a comment

You may use the following HTML:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.