Tagged: security

Unlocking a Car with an RTL-SDR and Yardstick One

Over on his YouTube channel Kalle Hallden has uploaded a video demonstrating how to perform a replay and "rolljam" attack on a wireless car key with an RTL-SDR and Yardstick One. His first experiment is a simple replay attack which involves recording the unlock signal from the car key with the Yardstick One in a place far away from the car so that it is not received, then replaying it close by.

This works well, but Kalle then explains rolling code security and how this would easily thwart any replay attack in the real world. However, he then goes on to explain and demonstrate the "rolljam" technique, which is one known way to get around rolling code security. The demonstrations are obviously not full tutorials, but are just high level overviews of how wireless security can be defeated.

Hacking Into A Car!

DEFCON 2020 Aerospace Village SDR Talks

A few weeks ago we posted about the recently uploaded talks listed on the Defcon YouTube channel. However, there is a second YouTube channel dedicated to talks presented as part of the Defcon Aerospace Village which was also held virtually. A number of these talks involve software defined radios and RTL-SDRs and so may be of interest to readers. We have listed a few interesting talks below, but the full list can be found on their YouTube channel.

 

BSides Talk: It’s 2020, so why am I still able to read your pager traffic?

At the BSides OK 2020 virtual conference Cameron Mac Millan recently presented a talk titled "It’s 2020, so why am I still able to read your pager traffic?". On this blog we have posted numerous times about privacy breaches stemming from insecure wireless pager traffic. Anyone with a radio or SDR can receive and decode pager messages, and this has been known and done since the 1980's. Cameron's talk explains how paging systems work, who are the modern users of pagers, how to capture and decode pager messages and how to best log and filter through messages. He goes on to describe a number of major pager security breaches that he's personally seen. The talk preview reads:

This talk explores why pagers remain a potential threat vector in many environments despite the technology being 40 years old. This is not a the-sky-is-falling presentation: everything from paging history to how simple it is to decode pager traffic (and the associated risks) is covered without FUD.

I enjoy poking things with sticks and turn over rocks to see what crawls out from under them. One of my interests is seeing how technologies believed to be obsolete can still pose a problem for security today, and do that from the perspective of a 20-year career in infosec. When not creating tomorrow’s problems with yesterday’s technology, I can usually be found wrenching on unusual cars.

It’s 2020, so why am I still able to read your pager traffic? - Cameron Mac Millan - BSidesOK 2020

Eavesdropping on LTE Calls with a USRP Software Defined Radio

Ars Technica recently ran a story about how University researchers have been able to eavesdrop on LTE mobile phone calls using a USRP B210 software defined radio which runs the Airscope software. The technique exploits a flaw in how some LTE carriers are implementing their keystream. A keystream is a stream of random data combined with the actual voice data, resulting in encrypted data.

It turns out that many LTE carriers reuse the same keystream when two calls are made within a single radio connection. An attacker can then record an encrypted conversation, then immediately call the victim after that conversation. The attacker can now access the encrypted keystream, and as the keystream is identical to the first conversation, the first conversation can now be decoded. 

The Ars Technica article, the original paper and a website created about the ReVoLTE technique and software go into detail about how the attack works. On the website the team explain the attack in simple terms:

The ReVoLTE attacks exploit the reuse of the same keystream for two subsequent calls within one radio connection. This weakness is caused by an implementation flaw of the base station (eNodeB). In order to determine how widespread the security gap was, we tested a number of randomly selected radio cells mainly across Germany but also other countries. The security gap affected 12 out of 15 base stations.

The ReVoLTE attack aims to eavesdrop the call between Alice and Bob. We will name this call the target or first call. To perform the attack, the attacker sniffs the encrypted radio traffic of Alice within the cell of a vulnerable base station. Shortly after the first call ends, the attacker calls Alice and engages her in a conversation. We name this second call, or keystream call. For this call, the attacker sniffs the encrypted radio traffic of Alice and records the unencrypted sound (known plaintext).

For decrypting the target call, the attacker must now compute the following: First, the attacker xors the known plaintext (recorded at the attacker's phone) with the ciphertext of the keystream call. Thus, the attacker computes the keystream of the keystream call. Due to the vulnerable base station, this keystream is the same as for the target (first) call. In a second step, the attacker decrypts the first call by xoring the keystream with the first call's ciphertext. It is important to note that the attacker has to engage the victim in a longer conversation. The longer he/she talked to the victim, the more content of the previous communication he/she can decrypt. For example, if the attacker and victim spoke for five minutes, the attacker could later decode five minutes of the previous conversation.

The ReVoLTE Attack

Demonstration of the ReVoLTE attack in a commerical LTE network.

DragonOS: Installing Crocodile Hunter For Detecting Fake 4G Cell Sites

A few days ago we posted about two SDR related DEFCON talks which were recently released. One of the talks was about detecting fake 4G base stations with a bladeRF SDR and a tool they created called "Crocodile Hunter". It is currently compatible with the bladeRF x40 and USRP B200. The talk summary is posted below as it nicely summarizes what fake 4G base stations are and what Crocodile Hunter can do.

4G based IMSI catchers such as the Hailstorm are becoming more popular with governments and law enforcement around the world, as well as spies, and even criminals. Until now IMSI catcher detection has focused on 2G IMSI catchers such as the Stingray which are quickly falling out of favor.

In this talk we will tell you how 4G IMSI Catchers might work to the best of our knowledge, and what they can and can't do. We demonstrate a brand new software project to detect fake 4G base stations, with open source software and relatively cheap hardware. And finally we will present a comprehensive plan to dramatically limit the capabilities of IMSI catchers (with the long term goal of making them useless once and for all).

The Crocodile Hunter software is apparently a little difficult to install and get running, so Aaron who runs DragonOS YouTube tutorial channel has uploaded a video documenting how to install and configure the software. The tutorial assumes that you are the running the latest DragonOS image which already includes a lot of the prerequisite software, and in his example he uses a USRP B205mini-i SDR.

DragonOS DEF CON 28 Crocodile Hunter Setup (DragonOS LTS PublicR4, srsLTE, USRP B205mini-i)

Defcon 2020 Online Talks: Satellite Eavesdropping & Detecting Fake 4G Base Stations

DEFCON 2020 was held online this year in and the talks were released a few days ago on their website and on YouTube. If you weren't already aware Defcon is a major yearly conference all about information security, and some of the talks deal with wireless and SDR topics. We found two very interesting SDR and wireless related talks that we have highlighted below. The first talk investigates using commercial satellite TV receivers to eavesdrop on satellite internet communications. The second discusses using a bladeRF or USRP to detect fake 4G cellphone basestations. Slides for these talks are available on the Defcon Media server under the presentations folder.

DEF CON Safe Mode - James Pavur - Whispers Among the Stars

Space is changing. The number of satellites in orbit will increase from around 2,000 today to more than 15,000 by 2030. This briefing provides a practical look at the considerations an attacker may take when targeting satellite broadband communications networks. Using $300 of widely available home television equipment I show that it is possible to intercept deeply sensitive data transmitted on satellite links by some of the world's largest organizations.

The talk follows a series of case studies looking at satellite communications affecting three domains: air, land, and sea. From home satellite broadband customers, to wind farms, to oil tankers and aircraft, I show how satellite eavesdroppers can threaten privacy and communications security. Beyond eavesdropping, I also discuss how, under certain conditions, this inexpensive hardware can be used to hijack active sessions over the satellite link.

The talk concludes by presenting new open source tools we have developed to help researchers seeking to improve satellite communications security and individual satellite customers looking to encrypt their traffic.

The talk assumes no background in satellite communications or cryptography but will be most interesting to researchers interested in tackling further unsolved security challenges in outer space.

DEF CON Safe Mode - James Pavur - Whispers Among the Stars

DEF CON Safe Mode - Cooper Quintin - Detecting Fake 4G Base Stations in Real Time

4G based IMSI catchers such as the Hailstorm are becoming more popular with governments and law enforcement around the world, as well as spies, and even criminals. Until now IMSI catcher detection has focused on 2G IMSI catchers such as the Stingray which are quickly falling out of favor.

In this talk we will tell you how 4G IMSI Catchers might work to the best of our knowledge, and what they can and can't do. We demonstrate a brand new software project to detect fake 4G base stations, with open source software and relatively cheap hardware. And finally we will present a comprehensive plan to dramatically limit the capabilities of IMSI catchers (with the long term goal of making them useless once and for all).

GitHub: https://github.com/EFForg/crocodilehunter

DEF CON Safe Mode - Cooper Quintin - Detecting Fake 4G Base Stations in Real Time

Derpcon 2020 Talk: Breaking into the World of Software Defined Radio

Derpcon is a COVID-19 inspired information security conference that was held virtually between April 30 - May 1 2020. Recently the talks have been uploaded to their YouTube channel. One interesting SDR talk we've seen was by Kelly Albrink and it is titled "Ham Hacks: Breaking into the World of Software Defined Radio". The talk starts by giving a very clear introduction to software defined radio, and then moves on to more a complex topic where Kelly shows how to analyze and reverse engineer digital signals using a HackRF and Universal Radio Hacker.

RF Signals are basically magic. They unlock our cars, power our phones, and transmit our memes. You’re probably familiar with Wifi and Bluetooth, but what happens when you encounter a more obscure radio protocol? If you’re a hacker who has always been too afraid of RF protocols to try getting into SDRs, or you have a HackRF collecting dust in your closet, this talk will show you the ropes. This content is for penetration testers and security researchers to introduce you to finding, capturing, and reverse engineering RF signals. I’ll cover the basics of RF so you’re familiar with the terminology and concepts needed to navigate the wireless world. We’ll compare SDR hardware from the $20 RTLSDR all the way up to the higher end radios, so you get the equipment that you need without wasting money. I’ll introduce some of the software you’ll need to interact with and analyze RF signals. And then we’ll tie it all together with a step by step demonstration of locating, capturing, and reverse engineering a car key fob signal.

Ham Hacks: Breaking into the World of Software Defined Radio - Kelly Albrink

Performing a Side Channel TEMPEST Attack on a PC

TEMPEST refers to a technique that is used to eavesdrop on electronic equipment via their unintentional radio emissions (as well as via sounds and vibrations). All electronics emit some sort of unintentional RF signals, and by capturing and processing those signals some data can be recovered. For example the unintentional signals from a computer screen could be captured, and converted back into a live image of what the screen is displaying. We have tutorials on how to do this with a program called TempestSDR available on a previous post of ours.

Recently Mikhail Davidov and Baron Oldenburg from duo.com have uploaded a write up about their TEMPEST experiments. The write up introduces the science behind TEMPEST eavesdropping first, then moves on to topics like software defined radios and antennas.

At the end of their post they perform some experiments like constantly writing data to memory on a PC, and putting the PCs GPU under varying load states. These experiments result in clear RFI bursts and pulsing carriers being visible in the spectrum, indicating that the PC is indeed unintentionally transmitting RF. They note that machine learning could be used to gather some information from these signals.

Their write up reminds us of previous TEMPEST related posts that we've uploaded in the past. One example is where an RTL-SDR was used to successfully attack AES encryption wirelessly via the unintentional RF emitted by an FPGA performing an encryption algorithm. Another interesting post was where we saw how a HackRF was used to obtain the PIN of a cyprocurrency hardware wallet via TEMPEST. Search TEMPEST on our blog for more posts like that.

TEMPEST PC Side Channel Setup: RF pulses from writing to memory and a GPU.
TEMPEST PC Side Channel Setup: RF pulses from writing to memory and a GPU.