Tagged: security

YouTube Tutorial: Eavesdropping on DECT6.0 Cordless Phones with a HackRF and GR-DECT2

Back in December of last year Corrosive from his YouTube channel SignalsEverywhere showed us a demo video of him receiving unecrypted DECT digital cordless phones with his HackRF.

DECT is an acronym for 'Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications', and is the wireless standard used by modern digital cordless phones as well as some digital baby monitors. In most countries DECT communications take place at 1880 - 1900 MHz, and in the USA at 1920 - 1930 MHz. Some modern cordless phones now use encryption on their DECT signal, but many older models do not, and most baby monitors do not either. However, DECT encryption is known to be weak, and can be broken with some effort.

In his latest video Corrosive shows us how to install GR-DECT2 on Linux, which is the GNU Radio based decoding software required to decode the DECT signal. He then goes on to show how the software can be used and finally provides some optimizations tips.

DECT 6.0 Cordless Phone Eavesdropping {Install GR-DECT2 and Decode with HackRF SDR}

Industrial Machines like Cranes, Excavators Can Easily be Hacked with Software Defined Radios

Recently, the RF research team at Trend Micro released a very nice illustrated report, technical paper and several videos demonstrating how they were able to take control of building cranes, excavators, scrapers and other large industrial machines with a simple bladeRF software defined radio. Trend Micro is a well known security company mostly known for their computer antivirus products.

Trend write that the main problem stems from the fact that these large industrial machines tend to rely on proprietary RF protocols, instead of utilizing modern standard secure protocols. It turns out that many of the proprietary RF commands used to control these machines have little to no security in place.

A Forbes article written about the research writes:

Five different kinds of attack were tested. They included: a replay attack, command injection, e-stop abuse, malicious re-pairing and malicious reprogramming. The replay attack sees the attackers simply record commands and send them again when they want. Command injection sees the hacker intercept and modify a command. E-stop abuse brings about an emergency stop, while malicious re-pairing sees a cloned controller take over the functions of the legitimate one. And malicious reprogramming places a permanent vulnerability at the heart of the controller so it can always be manipulated.

So straightforward were the first four types of attack, they could be carried out within minutes on a construction site and with minimal cost. The hackers only required PCs, the (free) code and RF equipment costing anywhere between $100 and $500. To deal with some of the idiosyncracies of the building site tech, they developed their own bespoke hardware and software to streamline the attacks, called RFQuack.

Being a responsible security firm, Trend Micro has already notified manufacturers of these vulnerabilities, and government level advisories (1, 2) and patches have already been rolled out over the last year. However the Forbes article states that some vulnerabilities still remain unpatched to this day. Of interest, the Forbes articles writes that for some of these vendors the simple idea of patching their system was completely new to them, with the firmware version for some controllers still reading 0.00A.

The videos showing the team taking control of a model crane, real crane and excavator are shown below. The video shows them using bladeRF 2.0 SDRs which are relatively low cost TX/RX capable software defined radios. We also recommend taking a look at Trends web article as it very nicely illustrates several different RF attack vectors which could apply to a number of different RF devices.

In the past we've also posted about similar serious RF attacks to infrastructure and machines that reveal the vulnerability and disregard to wireless security present in everyday systems. These include vulnerabilities like taking control of city disaster warning sirens, GPS spoofing of car navigation systems, hacking wireless door systems on cars, and revealing hospital pager privacy breaches.

Trend Micro Illustrates Replay Attacks
Trend Micro Illustrates Replay Attacks

Crane hacking Pt 1

Crane hacking Pt 2

YouTube Tutorial: Spying on Computer Monitors with TempestSDR

Over on YouTube SignalsEverywhere (aka Corrosive) has uploaded a tutorial video showing how to use TempestSDR with an Airspy SDR. Back in November 2017 we posted about how we were able to get TempestSDR to run with an RTL-SDR, Airspy and SDRplay, and showed some results. Since then several people have managed to repeat our results, but many have also had trouble understanding how to make TempestSDR work and what all the settings are for.

TempestSDR is an open source tool that allows you to use any SDR that has a supporting ExtIO (such as RTL-SDR, Airspy, SDRplay, HackRF) to receive the unintentional signal radiation from a screen, and turn that signal back into a live image. This can let you view what is on a screen without any physical connections.

Corrosive's tutorial video shows us how to tune the signal in the TempestSDR software in order to receive a clear image as well as showing the software in action.

How to Spy on Computer Monitors | TempestSDR Tutorial (with an Airspy)

Listening in to a DECT Digital Cordless Phone with a HackRF

Over on YouTube SignalsEverywhere (aka Corrosive) has uploaded a new video where he shows a demonstration of him listening in to a DECT digital cordless phone with his HackRF. 

DECT is an acronym for 'Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications', and is the wireless standard used by modern digital cordless phones as well as some digital baby monitors. In most countries DECT communications take place at 1880 - 1900 MHz, and in the USA at 1920 - 1930 MHz. Some modern cordless phones now use encryption on their DECT signal, but many older models do not, and most baby monitors do not either. However, DECT encryption is known to be weak, and can be broken with some effort.

In his video Corrosive uses gr-dect2, a GNU Radio based program that can decode unencrypted DECT signals. In the video he shows it decoding a DECT call from his cordless phone in real time.

Demonstration Listening to DECT Phone Call with a HackRF SDR

Using a HackRF SDR to Withhold Treatment from an Insulin Pump

A MiniMed Insulin Pump

Recently Arstechnica ran a story about how during this August's Black Hat security conference, researchers Billy Rios and Jonathan Butts revealed that a HackRF software defined radio could be used to withhold a scheduled dose of insulin from a Medtronic Insulin Pump. An insulin pump is a device that attaches to the body of a diabetic person and deliveries short bursts of insulin throughout the day. The Medtronic Insulin Pump has a wireless remote control function that can be exploited with the HackRF. About the exploit MiniMed wrote in response:

In May 2018, an external security researcher notified Medtronic of a potential security vulnerability with the MiniMedTM Paradigm™ family of insulin pumps and corresponding remote controller. We assessed the vulnerability and today issued an advisory, which was reviewed and approved by the FDA, ICS-CERT and Whitescope.

This vulnerability impacts only the subset of users who use a remote controller to deliver the Easy Bolus™ to their insulin pump. In the advisory, as well as through notifications to healthcare professionals and patients, we communicate some precautions that users of the remote controller can take to minimize risk and protect the security of their pump.

As part of our commitment to customer safety and device security, Medtronic is working closely with industry regulators and researchers to anticipate and respond to potential risks. In addition to our ongoing work with the security community, Medtronic has already taken several concrete actions to enhance device security and will continue to make significant investments to improve device security protection.

In addition to this wireless hack they also revealed issues with Medtronic's pacemaker, where they found that they could hack it via compromised programming hardware, and cause it to deliver incorrect shock treatments.

Earlier in the year we also posted about how an RTL-SDR could be used to sniff RF data packets from a Minimed Insulin pump using the rtlmm software, and back in 2016 we posted how data could be sniffed from an implanted defibrillator.

Exposing Hospital Pager Privacy Breaches

It has been a known open secret that for years many hospitals have been transmitting sensitive patient data over the air completely unencrypted via their pager network. With a simple ultra cheap radio such as an RTL-SDR, or any other cheap radio scanner such as a Baofeng, it is possible to eavesdrop on this sensitive data with very little technical knowledge required. Hospitals appear to be reluctant to upgrade their systems despite clearly being in violation of HIPAA privacy regulations in the USA.

Recently, @WatcherData has been trying to bring attention to this ongoing security breach in his home state of Kansas, and last month was able to get a news article about the problem published in the Kansas City Star newspaper. Over on Twitter he's also been actively documenting breaches that he's found by using an RTL-SDR to receive the pager messages.

Interestingly, publicity generated by @WatcherData's newspaper article has brought forward a hostile response from the hospital in question. Over on Reddit /r/legaladvice, a forum where anyone can ask legal advice questions, @watcherdata posted the following:

I discovered some time ago that hospitals throughout my region of the US are sending messages to physician pagers that include the name, age, sex, diagnosis, room number, and attending physician. These can be seen by anyone with a simple RTL SDR device, and a couple of free programs.

This seems like a massive HIPAA violation. So I contacted the main hospital sending out most of the information, and they were extremely grateful. I got a call within a day from a high level chairman, he explained their steps to remediate, that their auditors and penetration testers missed it, and that they would have it fixed within a week. Sure enough, they started using a patient number and no identifiable information in the pages. A couple of other hospitals have fixed their systems too, after I started contacting them via Twitter.

Early on in this process, I contacted my local newspaper. They reached out to the hospital in question, and were met with a "very hostile" response. They immediately deflected from any HIPAA violations and explained that I (the source) am in violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986.

This was enough to scare me off completely. I've nuked all log files from my systems and stopped collecting data. The reporters want to know how I would like to proceed. Originally, I was going to get full credit for the find in their article. But now, I at least need to be anonymous, and am thinking about asking them not to run the story at all.

Among the replies there doesn't seem to be consensus on whether simply receiving pager messages in the USA is legal or not.

In the past we've seen similar attempts to bring attention to these privacy breaches, such as an art installation in New York called Holypager, which simply continuously printed out all pager messages that were received with a HackRF for gallery patrons to read.

HolyPager Art Installation. HackRF One, Antenna and Raspberry Pi seen under the shelf.
HolyPager Art Installation. Printing pager messages continuously.

Using RTL_433 to Decode SimpliSafe Home Security Systems

SimpliSafe is an American DIY home security system company that claims over 2 million customers. Their system relies on 433/315 MHz ISM band wireless radio communications between its various sensors, control panels and remote controls. Back in 2016 we already posted about research from Dr. Andrew Zonenberg and Micheal Ossmann who showed that the SimpliSafe wireless communications are unencrypted, and can easily be intercepted, decoded, and spoofed. SimpliSafe responded to those concerns by downplaying them and mentioning that sophisticated hardware was required.

However, now Adam of simpleorsecure.net has recently disclosed a security advisory and a blog post discussing how easy it is to decode SimpliSafe wireless communications with an RTL-SDR and the rtl_433 software. He also also released slides from a recent talk that he did that go over his entire process and findings.

Adam began with some initial manual RF analysis with an RTL-SDR, and then later worked with rtl_433 dev Christian Zuckschwerd to add PiWM demodulation capability, which is the modulation used by SimpliSafe systems. Now Adam is able to easily decode the serial number, pin codes, and status codes transmitted by SimpliSafe sensors and key pads in real time with just an RTL-SDR.

This is very concerning as not only could a burglar easily learn the alarm disarm pincode, but they could also profile your behavior to find an optimal time to break in. For example if you arm your alarm before bed, and disarm in the morning your sleep schedule is being broadcast. It is also possible to determine if a particular door or window has been left open. With a tuned Yagi antenna Adam was able to receive signals from 200+ feet (60m) in free space, and 115 feet (35m) through walls.

In addition to the lack of encryption, Adam also discovered that the SimpliSafe system was susceptible to jamming attacks, and that the tamper detection system can be easily compromised. Adam has disclosed all concerns and findings to SimpliSafe who are aware of the problems. They assure him that next generation systems will not suffer from these flaws. But unfortunately for current generation owners, the hardware will need to be eventually replaced as there is no over the air update capability. 

An RTL-SDR and SimpliSafe KeyPad
An RTL-SDR and SimpliSafe KeyPad

Hacker Warehouse Demonstrates Pager Decoding with an RTL-SDR

Over on YouTube the web show Hacker Warehouse have created a video explaining wireless pagers and how RTL-SDRs can be used to sniff them. In the video host Troy Brown starts by explaining what pagers are and how they work, and then he shows how to decode them with SDR# and PDW. We have a tutorial on this project available here too.

Later in the video he shows some examples of pager messages that he's received. He shows censored messages such as hospital patient data being transmitted in plain text, sports scores, a memo from a .gov address claiming allegations of abuse from a client, office gossip about a hookup, a message about a drunk man with a knife, a message from a Windows server with IP address and URL, a message from a computer database, and messages from banks.

In the past we've also seen an art installation in New York which used SDR to highlight the blatant breach of privacy that these pager messages can contain.

Decoding Pager Data with RTLSDR - Tradecraft