Tagged: Automatic dependent surveillance broadcast

Running a NAS, Torrentbox and ADS-B RTL-SDR Server all on the same Raspberry Pi 3

Most readers are familiar with the Raspberry Pi 3 and how it can be used with RTL-SDR applications such as ADS-B reception. However, one does not need to dedicate an entire Pi 3 to a single task as they are more than powerful enough to run multiple applications at once.

Over on his blog 'Radio for Everyone' Akos has uploaded a tutorial that shows how he set his Raspberry Pi 3 up as a simultaneous Network Attached Storage (NAS), Torrentbox  and ADS-B server. A NAS is simply a hard drive or other data storage device that can be accessed easily over a network instead of having to be connected directly to a PC. A torrentbox is a device such as a Raspberry Pi 3 running torrent software so that you can download torrent files 24/7 without needing a PC on all the time.

Akos' tutorial shows how to set everything up from scratch, starting from writing the Raspbian SD Card and connecting to it via SSH. He then goes on to show how to install the torrent software, set up the NAS and finally set up ADS-B reception.

Pi 3 as a NAS, torrentbox and ADS-B server.
Pi 3 as a NAS, torrentbox and ADS-B server.

New Product: RTL-SDR Blog 1090 MHz ADS-B LNA

We're happy to announce the release of our new high performance low noise amplifier (LNA) for improving 1090 MHz ADS-B reception. The LNA uses a low noise figure high linearity two stage MGA-13116 amplifier chip and three stages of filtering to ensure that strong signals or interference will not overload either the amplifier or SDR dongle.

The LNA is currently only available from our Chinese warehouse, and costs US$24.95 including shipping. Please note that the price may increase slightly in the future, and that Amazon USA may not be stocked until March.

Click here to visit our store

RTLBlog_LNA_Product_Flat
RTLBlog_LNA_Product_PCB_Flat

An LNA can help improve ADS-B reception by reducing the noise figure of the system and by helping to overcome losses in the coax cable and/or any other components such as switches and connector in the signal path. To get the best performance from an LNA, the LNA needs to be positioned close to the antenna, before the coax to the radio.

The gain of the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA is 27 dB's at 1090 MHz, and out of band signals are reduced by at least 60 - 80 dB's. Attenuation in the broadcast FM band and below 800 MHz is actually closer to over 100 dB's. In the LNA signal path there is first a low insertion loss high pass filter that reduces the strength of any broadcast FM, TV, pager or other similar signals that are usually extremely strong. Then in between the first and second stage of the LNA is a SAW filter tuned for 1090 MHz. A second SAW filter sits on the output of the LNA. The result is that strong out of band signals are significantly blocked, yet the LNA remains effective at 1090 MHz with a low ~1 dB noise figure.

The LNA is also protected against ESD damage with a gas discharge tube and low capacitance ESD diode. But please always remember that your antenna must also be properly grounded to prevent ESD damage.

Finally please note that this LNA requires bias tee power to work. Bias tee power is when the DC power comes through the coax cable. The RTL-SDR V3 has bias tee power built into it and this can be activated in software. See the V3 users guide for information on how to activate it. Alternatively if you don't own a dongle with bias tee built in, then an external bias tee can be used and those can be found fairly cheaply on eBay. Finally, if you are confident with soldering SMT components, then there are also pads and a 0 Ohm resistor slot on the PCB to install an LDO and power the LNA directly.

Specification Summary:

  • Frequency: 1090 MHz
  • Gain: 27 dB @ 1090 MHz
  • Return Loss: -16 dB @ 1090 MHz (SWR = 1.377)
  • Noise Figure: ~1 dB
  • Out of band attenuation: More than 60 dB
  • ESD Protection: Dual with GDT and ESD Diode
  • Power: 3.3 - 5V via bias tee only, 150 mA current draw
  • Enclosure: Aluminum enclosure
  • Connectors: Two SMA Female (Male to Male adapter included)

Testing

We tested our new LNA against another ADS-B LNA with filter built in that is sold by another company and the FlightAware Prostick+ dongle in an environment with strong out of band signals such as pagers, broadcast FM, DVB-T and GSM signals. The results showed that the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA gathered the most ADS-B packets. In the tests both LNA's were connected on the receiver side to be fair to the FA dongle. Improved performance could be achieved by moving the LNA to the antenna side.

Other ADS-B LNA vs RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA Received Messages
FlightAware Prostick+ vs RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA Received Messages

Checking in SDR# for out of band signals also showed that the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA significantly reduces those strong out of band signals, whereas the others have trouble blocking them out. Below we show the results as well as some measurements.

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

Other ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

Other ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

FlightAware Prostick+ @ 1090 MHz

FlightAware Prostick+ @ 1090 MHz

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

FlightAware Protstick+ tuned to Broadcast FM

FlightAware Protstick+ tuned to Broadcast FM

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a DVB-T Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a DVB-T Signal

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a GSM Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a GSM Signal

Gain Measurements

Gain Measurements

Return Loss

Return Loss

Simulated Gain/Attenuation

Simulated Gain/Attenuation

Conclusion

This RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA can significantly improve ADS-B reception, especially if you are in an environment with strong out of band signals. Even if you are not, the low noise figure design will improve reception regardless.

Running a NAS, Torrentbox and ADS-B RTL-SDR Server all on the same Raspberry Pi 3

Most readers are familiar with the Raspberry Pi 3 and how it can be used with RTL-SDR applications such as ADS-B reception. However, one does not need to dedicate an entire Pi 3 to a single task as they are more than powerful enough to run multiple applications at once.

Over on his blog 'Radio for Everyone' Akos has uploaded a tutorial that shows how he set his Raspberry Pi 3 up as a simultaneous Network Attached Storage (NAS), Torrentbox  and ADS-B server. A NAS is simply a hard drive or other data storage device that can be accessed easily over a network instead of having to be connected directly to a PC. A torrentbox is a device such as a Raspberry Pi 3 running torrent software so that you can download torrent files 24/7 without needing a PC on all the time.

Akos' tutorial shows how to set everything up from scratch, starting from writing the Raspbian SD Card and connecting to it via SSH. He then goes on to show how to install the torrent software, set up the NAS and finally set up ADS-B reception.

Pi 3 as a NAS, torrentbox and ADS-B server.
Pi 3 as a NAS, torrentbox and ADS-B server.

New Product: RTL-SDR Blog 1090 MHz ADS-B LNA

We're happy to announce the release of our new high performance low noise amplifier (LNA) for improving 1090 MHz ADS-B reception. The LNA uses a low noise figure high linearity two stage MGA-13116 amplifier chip and three stages of filtering to ensure that strong signals or interference will not overload either the amplifier or SDR dongle.

The LNA is currently only available from our Chinese warehouse, and costs US$24.95 including shipping. Please note that the price may increase slightly in the future, and that Amazon USA may not be stocked until March.

Click here to visit our store

RTLBlog_LNA_Product_Flat
RTLBlog_LNA_Product_PCB_Flat

An LNA can help improve ADS-B reception by reducing the noise figure of the system and by helping to overcome losses in the coax cable and/or any other components such as switches and connector in the signal path. To get the best performance from an LNA, the LNA needs to be positioned close to the antenna, before the coax to the radio.

The gain of the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA is 27 dB's at 1090 MHz, and out of band signals are reduced by at least 60 - 80 dB's. Attenuation in the broadcast FM band and below 800 MHz is actually closer to over 100 dB's. In the LNA signal path there is first a low insertion loss high pass filter that reduces the strength of any broadcast FM, TV, pager or other similar signals that are usually extremely strong. Then in between the first and second stage of the LNA is a SAW filter tuned for 1090 MHz. A second SAW filter sits on the output of the LNA. The result is that strong out of band signals are significantly blocked, yet the LNA remains effective at 1090 MHz with a low ~1 dB noise figure.

The LNA is also protected against ESD damage with a gas discharge tube and low capacitance ESD diode. But please always remember that your antenna must also be properly grounded to prevent ESD damage.

Finally please note that this LNA requires bias tee power to work. Bias tee power is when the DC power comes through the coax cable. The RTL-SDR V3 has bias tee power built into it and this can be activated in software. See the V3 users guide for information on how to activate it. Alternatively if you don't own a dongle with bias tee built in, then an external bias tee can be used and those can be found fairly cheaply on eBay. Finally, if you are confident with soldering SMT components, then there are also pads and a 0 Ohm resistor slot on the PCB to install an LDO and power the LNA directly.

Specification Summary:

  • Frequency: 1090 MHz
  • Gain: 27 dB @ 1090 MHz
  • Return Loss: -16 dB @ 1090 MHz (SWR = 1.377)
  • Noise Figure: ~1 dB
  • Out of band attenuation: More than 60 dB
  • ESD Protection: Dual with GDT and ESD Diode
  • Power: 3.3 - 5V via bias tee only, 150 mA current draw
  • Enclosure: Aluminum enclosure
  • Connectors: Two SMA Female (Male to Male adapter included)

Testing

We tested our new LNA against another ADS-B LNA with filter built in that is sold by another company and the FlightAware Prostick+ dongle in an environment with strong out of band signals such as pagers, broadcast FM, DVB-T and GSM signals. The results showed that the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA gathered the most ADS-B packets. In the tests both LNA's were connected on the receiver side to be fair to the FA dongle. Improved performance could be achieved by moving the LNA to the antenna side.

Other ADS-B LNA vs RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA Received Messages
FlightAware Prostick+ vs RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA Received Messages

Checking in SDR# for out of band signals also showed that the RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA significantly reduces those strong out of band signals, whereas the others have trouble blocking them out. Below we show the results as well as some measurements.

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

Other ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

Other ADS-B LNA @ 1090 MHz

FlightAware Prostick+ @ 1090 MHz

FlightAware Prostick+ @ 1090 MHz

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to Broadcast FM

FlightAware Protstick+ tuned to Broadcast FM

FlightAware Protstick+ tuned to Broadcast FM

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a DVB-T Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a DVB-T Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a DVB-T Signal

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

RTL Blog ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

Other ADS-B LNA tuned to a GSM Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a GSM Signal

FlightAware Prostick+ tuned to a GSM Signal

Gain Measurements

Gain Measurements

Return Loss

Return Loss

Simulated Gain/Attenuation

Simulated Gain/Attenuation

Conclusion

This RTL-SDR Blog ADS-B LNA can significantly improve ADS-B reception, especially if you are in an environment with strong out of band signals. Even if you are not, the low noise figure design will improve reception regardless.

Tom’s Radio Room Tests and Reviews the RTL-SDR Blog Multipurpose Dipole Kit

Over on his YouTube channel Tom Stiles (hamrad88) has been experimenting with and reviewing our multipurpose dipole kit. Tom is a ham radio YouTuber who runs a show that produces content often, so we encourage you to subcribe to his channel if you're interested. Tom reviewed our dipole kit over a series of 5 videos which we link here [1: Discussing the product], [2: Unboxing], [3: First ADS-B Tests], [4: Second ADS-B Tests], [5: Third ADS-B Tests]. We post have embedded video 2 and 5 below.

In his testing Tom finds that using the antenna in the vertical orientation improves ADS-B performance. This is expected as ADS-B signals are vertically polarized, and so the antenna should be too. By using the included suction cup mount Tom is able to get the antenna attached to his window which improves reception by getting the antenna as close to the outdoors as possible. This is an expected use case for the antenna, and it's good to see that good results are being had!

If you're interested in the set please see our store at www.rtl-sdr.com/store, or use the links provided in Tom's videos. We also have a tutorial and use case demonstrations for our dipole kit available at www.rtl-sdr.com/DIPOLE.

A High Performance RTL-SDR ADS-B Receiver Build Guide

ADS-B Setup in an outdoor enclosure. Includes FlightAware ADS-B Antenna, FlightAware RTL-SDR Dongle, Raspberry Pi, POE Splitter.
ADS-B Setup in an outdoor enclosure. Includes FlightAware ADS-B Antenna, FlightAware RTL-SDR Dongle, Raspberry Pi, POE Splitter.

Over on Imgur and Reddit user Mavericknos has uploaded a very nice pictorial guide where he shows how he's built a high performance RTL-SDR based ADS-B receiver that can be mounted outside in a waterproof enclosure.

He uses a FlightAware dongle, which is an RTL-SDR optimized for best ADS-B reception when placed directly at the mast/antenna. For an antenna he uses the FlightAware ADS-B antenna, which we've reviewed in the past and found to be one of the best value ADS-B antennas available on the market. To process the data, a Raspberry Pi is used and it is powered via power over Ethernet (POE). If you didn't already know, power over Ethernet (not to be confused with Ethernet over powerline) is simply running power through unused wires inside an Ethernet cable. It is a convenient method of powering remote devices and giving them a network connection at the same time. The whole package is enclosed in a waterproof case, and the antenna attached to the top.

Putting the RTL-SDR and computing device at the antenna removes any loss from long coax runs, and the POE connection provides a tidy cabling scheme. The FlightAware dongle is a good choice for mounting directly at the mast or antenna because it has a built in low noise figure LNA. If using coax cabling instead, and keeping the RTL-SDR and Raspberry Pi inside, then it would be better to mount an LNA at the mast and power it through the coax via a bias tee.

All components in the build.
All components in the build.

 

Akos’ ADS-B Performance Comparison of 19 Different RTL-SDR Dongles

Over on his blog radioforeveryone.com author Akos has run a large comparative test of 19 different types and brands of RTL-SDR dongles on ADS-B reception. He takes multiple dongles from NooElecs Nano/Mini and SMArt range and our RTL-SDR Blog V3 unit and the FlightAware ADS-B optimized units. He also notes that E4000 based dongles such as the NooElec XTR are unable to receive ADS-B frequencies and excludes them from the test.

For his tests he used a Raspberry Pi 3 and compares two dongles at a time. The results are about as would be predicted. The tiny Nano dongles are usually the worst performers due to their trade off in size vs heat dissipation and internally generated noise. The standard sized dongles all perform about the same, but the dongles with heatsinking perform the best. Of course the FlightAware dongles still get the best ADS-B reception due to their significantly lower noise figure thanks to the built in ADS-B LNA.

One interesting finding is that Akos shows that heat does play a noticeable role in performance of these dongles at 1090 MHz. Akos noticed that the better heatsinking on the RTL-SDR Blog V3 or cooler days improved reception.

Some of the tested RTL-SDR dongles
Some of the tested RTL-SDR dongles

Running the PiAware ADS-B Decoder on a $9 C.H.I.P Computer

Over on his blog Adam Melton has created a post that fully details how to install FlightAware’s PiAware ADS-B feeder software on a $9 C.H.I.P single board PC. The C.H.I.P is a very small board with WiFi built in, so this makes an excellent small form factor platform for an RTL-SDR running a dedicated ADS-B decoder like PiAware.

In the post he shows how to make a cheap quarter wave ground plane antenna for ADS-B and then goes on to show the installation steps required to get PiAware running on the C.H.I.P. He also mentions his Power over Ethernet (PoE) setup which allows him to power the RTL-SDR and C.H.I.P via an Ethernet cable which also provides the network connection. A power setup like this is great for getting your receiver in a remote location without coax cable losses, although you do need to watch the voltage drop on the Ethernet cable.

The C.H.I.P is a cheap $9 single board computer that had a successful Kickstarter back in 2015. Unfortunately since the Kickstarter it has been almost impossible to obtain a unit (we’ve been waiting over a year). Hopefully more will ship soon.

PiAware ADS-B RTL-SDR Setup Test on a C.H.I.P
PiAware ADS-B RTL-SDR Setup Test on a C.H.I.P

HamRadio360 Podcast: ADS-B Aircraft Tracking with an RTL-SDR

HamRadio360 is a bi-weekly podcast all about ham radio and related topics. On their June 13 podcast Nick, KK6LHR came on to discuss his experiences with decoding ADS-B with cheap SDR radio like the RTL-SDR. In the podcast they talk about the history of ADS-B, what it is, the difference between the 1090 MHz and 978 MHz frequencies, what all of the terms and acronyms mean, feeding sites like flightaware and flightradar24 and of course how to decode it with various forms of software packages.

Part of Nick's ADS-B Setup
Part of Nick’s ADS-B Setup

Creating an Encrypted ADS-B Plane Spotter with a Raspberry Pi, RTL-SDR and SSL

These days it’s quite easy to share your ADS-B reception on the internet with giant worldwide aggregation sites like flightaware.com and flightradar24.com. These sites aggregate received ADS-B plane location data received by RTL-SDR users from all around the world and display it all together on a web based map.

However, what if you don’t want to share your data on these sites but still want to share it over the internet with friends or others without directly revealing your IP address? Some of the team at beame.io have uploaded a post that shows how to use their beame.io service to securely share your ADS-B reception over the internet. Beame.io appears to be a service that can be used to expose local network applications to the internet via secure HTTPS tunneling. Essentially this can allow someone to connect to a service on your PC (e.g. ADS-B mapping), without you revealing your public IP address and therefore exposing your PC to hacking.

On their post they show how to set up the RTL-SDR compatible dump1090 ADS-B decoder on a Raspberry Pi, and then connect it to their beame-instal-ssl service.

Encrypted ADS-B Sharing with the beame.io service.
Encrypted ADS-B Sharing with the beame.io service.