Tagged: sdr#

Testing Sharp Slicer: Multiple Spectrum Slices via SDR# with an Airspy SDR

Youssef the author of SDR# has recently released an update which adds a feature called "Sharp Slicer". This feature allows Airspy SDR users to open multiple instances of SDR#, each able to tune to a seperate signal within the currently tuned frequency range of the SDR. This is somewhat similar to the old multi-VFO plugin from rtl-sdr.ru, however the advantage of Slicer is that you can have seperate spectrum and waterfall graphs for each signal. This could be especially useful for monitoring multiple narrowband HF modes with an Airspy HF+ Discovery. 

To use Sharp Slicer you must have an Airspy SDR, be it an Airspy Mini/R2 or HF+/Discovery. Unfortunately it will not work with RTL-SDR or other SDRs. Once the SDR is running in SDR#, simply press the "+" button on the top left to open a new Slicer instance. It seems possible to open as many instances as you want, and probably the only limitation is your CPU. On our Intel i7-6700 we tested up to 8 instances running at the maximum bandwidth of an Airspy Mini, and the SDR# CPU utilization was only at 50%.

A nice touch is that you can also see the location of each VFO on the master SDR# instance, and the color can be changed on each Slicer instance.

Over on Twitter @ea3ibc has also been testing:

Defcon 2020 Online Talks: Satellite Eavesdropping & Detecting Fake 4G Base Stations

DEFCON 2020 was held online this year in and the talks were released a few days ago on their website and on YouTube. If you weren't already aware Defcon is a major yearly conference all about information security, and some of the talks deal with wireless and SDR topics. We found two very interesting SDR and wireless related talks that we have highlighted below. The first talk investigates using commercial satellite TV receivers to eavesdrop on satellite internet communications. The second discusses using a bladeRF or USRP to detect fake 4G cellphone basestations. Slides for these talks are available on the Defcon Media server under the presentations folder.

DEF CON Safe Mode - James Pavur - Whispers Among the Stars

Space is changing. The number of satellites in orbit will increase from around 2,000 today to more than 15,000 by 2030. This briefing provides a practical look at the considerations an attacker may take when targeting satellite broadband communications networks. Using $300 of widely available home television equipment I show that it is possible to intercept deeply sensitive data transmitted on satellite links by some of the world's largest organizations.

The talk follows a series of case studies looking at satellite communications affecting three domains: air, land, and sea. From home satellite broadband customers, to wind farms, to oil tankers and aircraft, I show how satellite eavesdroppers can threaten privacy and communications security. Beyond eavesdropping, I also discuss how, under certain conditions, this inexpensive hardware can be used to hijack active sessions over the satellite link.

The talk concludes by presenting new open source tools we have developed to help researchers seeking to improve satellite communications security and individual satellite customers looking to encrypt their traffic.

The talk assumes no background in satellite communications or cryptography but will be most interesting to researchers interested in tackling further unsolved security challenges in outer space.

DEF CON Safe Mode - James Pavur - Whispers Among the Stars

DEF CON Safe Mode - Cooper Quintin - Detecting Fake 4G Base Stations in Real Time

4G based IMSI catchers such as the Hailstorm are becoming more popular with governments and law enforcement around the world, as well as spies, and even criminals. Until now IMSI catcher detection has focused on 2G IMSI catchers such as the Stingray which are quickly falling out of favor.

In this talk we will tell you how 4G IMSI Catchers might work to the best of our knowledge, and what they can and can't do. We demonstrate a brand new software project to detect fake 4G base stations, with open source software and relatively cheap hardware. And finally we will present a comprehensive plan to dramatically limit the capabilities of IMSI catchers (with the long term goal of making them useless once and for all).

GitHub: https://github.com/EFForg/crocodilehunter

DEF CON Safe Mode - Cooper Quintin - Detecting Fake 4G Base Stations in Real Time

TechMinds: Using Public Online SDRs without SDR Hardware

This weeks video on the TechMinds channel explores the various online web SDRs that are available to access for free. Accessing these online SDRs does not require any hardware apart from a PC and internet connection, although of course you are then receiving signals from a different location to yourself. 

In the video he shows how to access the SDR# Spy Server Network which mostly consists of Airpsy and RTL-SDR units, the SDR-Console V3 Server network which consists of a wide array of different SDRs, the browser based WebSDR network which is mostly soundcard based SDRs but also RTL-SDR and other SDRs, and finally the KiwiSDR network which is made up of KiwiSDRs.

Using Software Defined Radio Without SDR Hardware - WebSDR

Alpha Version of SDR++ Released

SDR++ is an open source general purpose cross platform SDR program that Alexandre Rouma (@WhatsTheGeekYT) has been working on for the past few months. Recently he released his first Windows Alpha version to the public which is available from the GitHub release page. The SDR++ GUI is inspired by SDR#, however, SDR++ as you might guess is programmed in C++ instead of C#.

In order to use SDR++ on Windows you will first need to have installed PothosSDR for the SoapySDR and volk support. To do this you can follow the instructions here. Thanks to the SoapySDR support it is able to run with most SDRs including the RTL-SDR.

To start the program, select your SDR from the source menu, change the sample rate (which is set to the minimum value by default), then click the play button. We tested it with both an RTL-SDR and HackRF, and both units worked just fine, although at lower sample rates the waterfall was a bit choppy. We do note that the software is very much in the alpha phase with only a few features implemented, and most menu items do not work yet. But the main features including WFM, FM, AM, SSB, CW demodulation as well as the spectrum and waterfall are all functional. Unfortunately there do seem to be a few stability issues as we experienced frequent crashes on our PC.

We'll be watching this software with interest to see how it progresses.

Current Features

  • Uses SoapySDR for wide hardware support
  • Hardware accelerated graphics (OpenGL + ImGui)
  • SIMD accelerated DSP (parts of the DSP are still missing)
  • Cross-platform
  • Full waterfall update when possible. Makes browsing signals easier and more pleasant

Coming soon

  • Multi-VFO
  • Plugins
  • Digital demodulators and decoders
  • Quick replay (replay last n seconds, cool if you missed a short signal)

Small things to add

  • Switchable bandwidth for demodulators
  • Switchable audio output device and sample rate
  • Recording
  • Light theme (I know you weirdos exist lol)
  • Waterfall color scheme editor
  • Switchable fft size
  • Bias-T enable/disable
  • other small customisation options
  • Save waterfall and demod settings between sessions
  • "Hide sidebar" option
  • Input filter bandwidth option

Known issues (please check before reporting)

  • Random crashes (yikes)
  • Gains aren't stepped
  • The default gains might contain a bogus value before being adjusted
  • Clicks in the audio
  • In some cases, it takes a long time to select a device (RTL-SDR in particular)
  • Min and Max buttons can get unachievable values (eg. min > max or min = max);
The SDR++ Interface
The SDR++ Interface

Frugal Radio: 2020 SDR Guide Ep 2 – Using Free Online SDRs

Over on his YouTube channel Frugal Radio has released the second episode in his 2020 SDR Guide series. In this video, Frugal Radio shows how to connect to remote SDRs such as KiwiSDR OpenWebRX, WebSDR, SDR-Console v3 Servers, and SDR# SpyServers. He shows how to use these remote SDRs to monitor long range aviation channels, amateur radio operators, and VHF Public Safety channels in the US. He also demonstrates how to decode HFDL signals from aircraft using WebSDR and free software, and verifies the aircraft locations via online tracking sites.

2020 SDR Guide Ep 2 : How to use over 500 remote SDRs free online (webSDR, KiwiSDR & HFDL decode)

Controlling Frequency in SDR# with a Barcode Scanner

Thank you to Manuel Lausmann for submitting his YouTube video showing how he has set up a system that allows him to rapidly change frequencies in SDR# with a barcode scanner and some barcodes printed via an online generated. This might be an interesting way for non-technical users to easily change frequencies on demand, for example in a public demonstration of various radio channels.

We note that the video is narrated in German, but you can use the YouTube auto-translation feature to get English subtitles.

Schneller Frequenzwechsel mit einem Barcode Scanner

SDRA2020 Online Conference Videos

The Software Defined Radio Academy is an organization that holds a conference within the yearly HAMRADIO fair in Friedrichshafen, Germany. This year due to the pandemic the conference was held online, and recently videos from the various talks have begun to slowly get uploaded to their YouTube channel.

The talks are typically very technical in nature, but if you're interested in cutting edge SDR research and applications then these are good talks to get caught up on. Currently there are seven videos that have been uploaded, but we are expecting that there are more to come since there are more talks listed in their programme. They appear to be uploading one video per day at the moment so get subscribed to their YouTube channel for the upcoming videos.

The currently uploaded talks include:

  • A Keynote interview with N1UL Dr. Ulrich Rohde
  • Laurence Barker G8NJJ: Using Xilinx Vivado for SDR Development
  • Edwin Richter DC9OE, Crt Valentincic S56GYK: Usage of higher order Nyquist Zones with Direct Sampling Devices
  • Prof. Dr. Michael Hartje DK5HH: Signalprocessing in the man made noise measurement system ENAMS
  • Bart Somers PE1RIK: Long term spectrum monitoring using GNUradio and Python

We are looking forward to the upcoming talks like the one by Dr. Bastian Bloessl DF1BBL that discusses the GNU Radio on Android implementation.

SDRA2020 - 03/04 - Laurence Barker: Using Xilinx Vivado for SDR Development

Talks from the 2020 HamSCI Convention (Held Online)

HamSCI is an organization dedicated citizen radio science and specifically the "publicity and promotion of projects that advance scientific research and understanding through amateur radio activities". Recently they held their HamSCI 2020 workshop online, and the videos are now available on the Ham Radio 2.0 YouTube channel. Several of the projects mentioned in the talks involve the use of software defined radios.

Come join HamSCI at its third annual workshop! Due to restrictions caused by the COVID-19 Coronavirus, this year's workshop will he held as a virtual, eletronic workshop. The meeting will take place March 20-21, 2020 using Zoom Webinar Services hosted by The University of Scranton in Scranton, PA . The primary objective of the HamSCI workshop is to bring together the amateur radio community and professional scientists. The theme of the 2020 HamSCI Workshop is "The Auroral Connection: How does the aurora affect amateur radio, and what can we learn about the aurora from radio techniques?" Invited speakers include Dr. Elizabeth MacDonald, NASA Scientist and founder of Aurorasaurus, Dr. James LaBelle, Dartmouth Space Scientist and expert on radio aurora, and Dave Hallidy K2DH, an expert in ham radio auroral communication.

One talk discusses the HamSCI personal weather station project, which is an SDR and Raspberry Pi based solution that monitors HF signals like WSPR, as well as characterizing HF noise, detecting lightning and ionospheric disturbances.

HamSCI 2020 Overview of the Personal Space Weather Station and Project Update

Another talk discusses the TangerineSDR, which is an open source SDR currently in development by TAPR. The goal of the TangerineSDR is to be a sub $500 SDR with a focus on space science, academic research as well as general amateur use. 

HamSCI 2020 TangerineSDR Data Engine and Overall Architecture

The rest of the talks can be found on the Ham Radio 2.0 YouTube playlist.