Tagged: patch antenna

SignalsEverywhere Reviews our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Active Patch Antenna Kit

Over on the SignalsEverywhere YouTube channel Corrosive from the SignalsEverywhere channel has uploaded a review of our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Active Patch antenna. Our patch antenna can be used for applications such as Inmarsat, Iridium and GPS reception. 

In the video Corrosive shows what the kit comes with, and first demonstrates the antenna working indoors. He also shows how signal SNR can be improved for indoor reception simply by adding a larger ground plane to the back of the antenna and clamping it on with the mounting screw. Later he shows what reception is like outdoors, and shows it being used to decode from STD-C Inmarsat and Iridium signals.

If you're interested in this antenna we also previously posted about TechMinds review video.

The antenna is available for sale on our web store, or from Amazon.

RTL SDR Blog L-Band Inmarsat/Iridium Satellite Service Patch Antenna

TechMinds Reviews our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Antenna + Horn & Dish Mod

Over on YouTube the TechMinds YouTube channel has uploaded a review of our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band patch antenna which we recently released. TechMinds tests the antenna on a STD-C Inmarsat channel with the Scytale-C decoder, and on various AERO ACARS transmissions with JAERO. Later in the video he also tests the patch antenna on Iridium reception using the Iridium Toolkit software. In all tests the patch is able to suitably receive the signal with either an RTL-SDR or Airspy SDR.

We also wanted to make a note about an additional tip regarding polarization that many people using the antenna seem to have missed. As Inmarsat signals are LHCP polarized, it is important to not only point the antenna towards the satellite, but also to rotate the antenna to match the polarization until maximum SNR is achieved. The rotation can make the difference between strong signals and nothing received at all.

RTL-SDR Active L-Band Patch Antenna For Inmarsat / Iridium / GPS

We've also recently seen a user 'Bert' who has needed to boost the signal strength as he was running the patch inside and at a location in northern Europe with poor reception of Inmarsat. To boost it he simply added a metal horn over the patch made from an old aluminum box, and also a back plate reflector. He notes that this improved his SNR on AERO 10500 from 8 - 9 dB, up to 12 - 14 dB. He also tested using the patch on a dish antenna, and found very good results too.

Aluminum Horn Added to L-Band Patch
Aluminum Horn Added to L-Band Patch
L-Band Patch Antenna on Dish
L-Band Patch Antenna on Dish

Testing a PCB Patch Antenna and Radiosonde QFH Antenna for Inmarsat and Iridium Reception

Over on his YouTube channel Tech Minds has been testing some antennas for Inmarsat and Iridium L-Band satellite reception. Inmarsat is a satellite service that runs on geostationary satellites, and one can be received from almost anywhere in the world. There are various services, but the ones that are easily decodable are STD-C EGC and AERO. EGC contains text information search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather and incident reports, and AERO is a form of satellite ACARS, and typically contains short messages from aircraft.

In the first video Tech Minds tests what appears to be an as of yet unreleased prototype PCB patch antenna being designed by NooElec. The PCB patch antenna is combined with a SAWBird Inmarsat LNA and an RTL-SDR. With it he's able to receive STD-C and AERO signals.

In the second video Tech Minds tests an L-Band QFH antenna salvaged from a Vaisala weather balloon radiosonde. The QFH is designed for GPS frequencies, but can potentially be used at the slightly higher Inmarsat and Iridium frequencies. Tech Minds combines the QFH antenna with a SAWBird Inmarsat LNA, but unfortunately finds that reception is too weak for any AERO decoding to be possible. However, when used on the higher Iridium frequencies the antenna works well, and he's able to decode packets with Iridium Toolkit.

New Inmarsat Antenna from NooElec

Testing A QFH Antenna For Inmarsat And Iridium

RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Antenna Preview

We note that over the last several months we have been working on our own L-band patch antenna that will cover Inmarsat, GPS and Iridium frequencies all in one. We expect manufacturing to be completed near the end of the month, or early next month.

The antenna is a ceramic patch, and will come in a waterproof enclosure. It will be possible to easily mount the antenna on a window or elsewhere using the standard suction cup and bendy legs tripod included with our dipole kits. Target price is US$39.95 including the suction cup, tripod, 2M coax and shipping, but we may have it initially on sale for a lower price.

This is cheaper than buying an Inmarsat & Iridium LNA, but a bit more than the SDR-Kits patches that they brought out a few weeks ago. Although performance of our patch is much better. Keep an eye out for the initial information post coming in the next few days.

RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Preview (RTL-SDR for Scale)
RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Preview (RTL-SDR for Scale)

Outernet: Patch antenna now sold seperately + other products

Back in June we tested Outernet’s new Dreamcatcher which is an ARM based computing board with RTL-SDR and L-band LNA built in. The $99 USD kit also included an external active L-band patch antenna. The Dreamcatcher full kit has now been reduced to $89 USD, and the active L-band patch antenna can also now be purchased by itself for $29 USD. The active patch antenna is also compatible with the bias tee on our V3 dongles and is a good low cost option for exploring most L-band satellite signals like Outernet, Inmarsat STD-C and AERO around 1542 MHz. The filter does unfortunately cut off the higher Iridium frequencies though.

They are also selling off their older L-band SDRx RTL-SDR boards at a reduced price of $20 USD. The SDRx is a RTL-SDR PCB with a built in L-band LNA and filter, but unlike the Dreamcatcher does not have built in computing hardware. They also have a limited $25 USD edition version of their active patch antenna which includes a built in RTL-SDR. This version is a bit more noisy compared to the standard active patch, but may be an interesting experimental antenna for some.

Current Outernet Products
Current Outernet Products

Review: Outernet LNA and Patch Antenna

Recently we posted news that Outernet had released their 1.5 GHz LNA, Patch Antenna and E4000 Elonics RTL-SDR + E4000/LNA Bundle. When used together, the products can be used to receive the Outernet L-band satellite signal, as well as other decodable L-band satellite signals like AERO and Inmarsat STD-C EGC. Outernet is a new satellite service that aims to be a free “library in the sky”. They continuously broadcast services such as news, weather, videos and other files from satellites.

EDIT: For international buyers the Outernet store has now started selling these products at http://store.outernet.is.

A few days ago we received the LNA and patch antenna for review. The patch antenna is similar to the one we received a while ago when writing our STD-C EGC tutorial, although this one is now slightly larger. It is roughly 12 x 12 cm in size, 100g heavy and comes with about 13 cm of high quality RG316 coax cable with a right angled SMA male connector on the end. The coax cable is clamped on the back for effective strain relief.

The Outernet patch antenna and LNA
The Outernet patch antenna and LNA

The LNA is manufactured by NooElec for Outernet. It amplifies with 34 dB gain from 1525 – 1559 MHz, with its center frequency at 1542 MHz. It must be powered via a 3 – 5.5V bias tee and draws 25 mA. The package consists of a 5 x 2.5 cm PCB board with one female and one male SMA connector. The components are protected by a shielding can. Inside the shielding can we see a MAX12000 LNA chip along with a TA1405A SAW filter. The MAX12000 (datasheet here) is an LNA designed for GPS applications and has a NF of 1 dB. It has a design where there are two amplifiers embedded within the chip, and it allows you to connect a SAW filter in between them. The TA1405A SAW filter appears to be produced by Golledge (datasheet here), and it has about a 3 dB insertion loss.

The Outernet L-Band LNA
The Outernet L-Band LNA
Inside the Outernet LNA
Inside the Outernet LNA

We tested the patch and LNA together with one of our V3 RTL-SDR Blog dongles, with the bias tee turned on. The LNA was connected directly to the dongle, with no coax in between. The patch antenna was angled to point towards the Inmarsat satellite. A 5 meter USB extension cord was then used to interface with a PC. The images below demonstrate the performance we were able to get.

Outernet Signal

Outernet Signal

Outernet Signal with 4x Decimation

Outernet Signal with 4x Decimation

AERO

AERO

STD-C EGC

STD-C EGC

Loading image... Loading image... Loading image... Loading image...

The Outernet team writes that a SNR level of only 2 dB is needed for decoding to work on their signal. With the patch and LNA we were able to get at least 12 dB so this is more than good enough. Other signals such as AERO and STD-C EGC also came in very strongly. Even when not angled at the satellite and placed flat on a table it was able to receive the signal with about 5 dB’s of SNR.

In conclusion the patch and LNA worked very well at receiving the Outernet signal as well as AERO and STD-C EGC. We think these products are great value for money if you are interested in these L-Band signals, and they make it very easy to receive. The only minor problem with the patch antenna is that there is no stand for it, which makes it difficult to mount in a way that faces the satellite. However this issue can easily be fixed with some sellotape and your own mount.

In the future once the Outernet Rpi3 OS and decoder image is released we hope to show a demonstration and tutorial on receiving Outernet data.

SignalsEverywhere Reviews our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Active Patch Antenna Kit

Over on the SignalsEverywhere YouTube channel Corrosive from the SignalsEverywhere channel has uploaded a review of our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Active Patch antenna. Our patch antenna can be used for applications such as Inmarsat, Iridium and GPS reception. 

In the video Corrosive shows what the kit comes with, and first demonstrates the antenna working indoors. He also shows how signal SNR can be improved for indoor reception simply by adding a larger ground plane to the back of the antenna and clamping it on with the mounting screw. Later he shows what reception is like outdoors, and shows it being used to decode from STD-C Inmarsat and Iridium signals.

If you're interested in this antenna we also previously posted about TechMinds review video.

The antenna is available for sale on our web store, or from Amazon.

RTL SDR Blog L-Band Inmarsat/Iridium Satellite Service Patch Antenna

TechMinds Reviews our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Antenna + Horn & Dish Mod

Over on YouTube the TechMinds YouTube channel has uploaded a review of our RTL-SDR Blog L-Band patch antenna which we recently released. TechMinds tests the antenna on a STD-C Inmarsat channel with the Scytale-C decoder, and on various AERO ACARS transmissions with JAERO. Later in the video he also tests the patch antenna on Iridium reception using the Iridium Toolkit software. In all tests the patch is able to suitably receive the signal with either an RTL-SDR or Airspy SDR.

We also wanted to make a note about an additional tip regarding polarization that many people using the antenna seem to have missed. As Inmarsat signals are LHCP polarized, it is important to not only point the antenna towards the satellite, but also to rotate the antenna to match the polarization until maximum SNR is achieved. The rotation can make the difference between strong signals and nothing received at all.

RTL-SDR Active L-Band Patch Antenna For Inmarsat / Iridium / GPS

We've also recently seen a user 'Bert' who has needed to boost the signal strength as he was running the patch inside and at a location in northern Europe with poor reception of Inmarsat. To boost it he simply added a metal horn over the patch made from an old aluminum box, and also a back plate reflector. He notes that this improved his SNR on AERO 10500 from 8 - 9 dB, up to 12 - 14 dB. He also tested using the patch on a dish antenna, and found very good results too.

Aluminum Horn Added to L-Band Patch
Aluminum Horn Added to L-Band Patch
L-Band Patch Antenna on Dish
L-Band Patch Antenna on Dish

Testing a PCB Patch Antenna and Radiosonde QFH Antenna for Inmarsat and Iridium Reception

Over on his YouTube channel Tech Minds has been testing some antennas for Inmarsat and Iridium L-Band satellite reception. Inmarsat is a satellite service that runs on geostationary satellites, and one can be received from almost anywhere in the world. There are various services, but the ones that are easily decodable are STD-C EGC and AERO. EGC contains text information search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather and incident reports, and AERO is a form of satellite ACARS, and typically contains short messages from aircraft.

In the first video Tech Minds tests what appears to be an as of yet unreleased prototype PCB patch antenna being designed by NooElec. The PCB patch antenna is combined with a SAWBird Inmarsat LNA and an RTL-SDR. With it he's able to receive STD-C and AERO signals.

In the second video Tech Minds tests an L-Band QFH antenna salvaged from a Vaisala weather balloon radiosonde. The QFH is designed for GPS frequencies, but can potentially be used at the slightly higher Inmarsat and Iridium frequencies. Tech Minds combines the QFH antenna with a SAWBird Inmarsat LNA, but unfortunately finds that reception is too weak for any AERO decoding to be possible. However, when used on the higher Iridium frequencies the antenna works well, and he's able to decode packets with Iridium Toolkit.

New Inmarsat Antenna from NooElec

Testing A QFH Antenna For Inmarsat And Iridium

RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Antenna Preview

We note that over the last several months we have been working on our own L-band patch antenna that will cover Inmarsat, GPS and Iridium frequencies all in one. We expect manufacturing to be completed near the end of the month, or early next month.

The antenna is a ceramic patch, and will come in a waterproof enclosure. It will be possible to easily mount the antenna on a window or elsewhere using the standard suction cup and bendy legs tripod included with our dipole kits. Target price is US$39.95 including the suction cup, tripod, 2M coax and shipping, but we may have it initially on sale for a lower price.

This is cheaper than buying an Inmarsat & Iridium LNA, but a bit more than the SDR-Kits patches that they brought out a few weeks ago. Although performance of our patch is much better. Keep an eye out for the initial information post coming in the next few days.

RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Preview (RTL-SDR for Scale)
RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Preview (RTL-SDR for Scale)

Outernet: Patch antenna now sold seperately + other products

Back in June we tested Outernet’s new Dreamcatcher which is an ARM based computing board with RTL-SDR and L-band LNA built in. The $99 USD kit also included an external active L-band patch antenna. The Dreamcatcher full kit has now been reduced to $89 USD, and the active L-band patch antenna can also now be purchased by itself for $29 USD. The active patch antenna is also compatible with the bias tee on our V3 dongles and is a good low cost option for exploring most L-band satellite signals like Outernet, Inmarsat STD-C and AERO around 1542 MHz. The filter does unfortunately cut off the higher Iridium frequencies though.

They are also selling off their older L-band SDRx RTL-SDR boards at a reduced price of $20 USD. The SDRx is a RTL-SDR PCB with a built in L-band LNA and filter, but unlike the Dreamcatcher does not have built in computing hardware. They also have a limited $25 USD edition version of their active patch antenna which includes a built in RTL-SDR. This version is a bit more noisy compared to the standard active patch, but may be an interesting experimental antenna for some.

Current Outernet Products
Current Outernet Products

Review: Outernet LNA and Patch Antenna

Recently we posted news that Outernet had released their 1.5 GHz LNA, Patch Antenna and E4000 Elonics RTL-SDR + E4000/LNA Bundle. When used together, the products can be used to receive the Outernet L-band satellite signal, as well as other decodable L-band satellite signals like AERO and Inmarsat STD-C EGC. Outernet is a new satellite service that aims to be a free “library in the sky”. They continuously broadcast services such as news, weather, videos and other files from satellites.

EDIT: For international buyers the Outernet store has now started selling these products at http://store.outernet.is.

A few days ago we received the LNA and patch antenna for review. The patch antenna is similar to the one we received a while ago when writing our STD-C EGC tutorial, although this one is now slightly larger. It is roughly 12 x 12 cm in size, 100g heavy and comes with about 13 cm of high quality RG316 coax cable with a right angled SMA male connector on the end. The coax cable is clamped on the back for effective strain relief.

The Outernet patch antenna and LNA
The Outernet patch antenna and LNA

The LNA is manufactured by NooElec for Outernet. It amplifies with 34 dB gain from 1525 – 1559 MHz, with its center frequency at 1542 MHz. It must be powered via a 3 – 5.5V bias tee and draws 25 mA. The package consists of a 5 x 2.5 cm PCB board with one female and one male SMA connector. The components are protected by a shielding can. Inside the shielding can we see a MAX12000 LNA chip along with a TA1405A SAW filter. The MAX12000 (datasheet here) is an LNA designed for GPS applications and has a NF of 1 dB. It has a design where there are two amplifiers embedded within the chip, and it allows you to connect a SAW filter in between them. The TA1405A SAW filter appears to be produced by Golledge (datasheet here), and it has about a 3 dB insertion loss.

The Outernet L-Band LNA
The Outernet L-Band LNA
Inside the Outernet LNA
Inside the Outernet LNA

We tested the patch and LNA together with one of our V3 RTL-SDR Blog dongles, with the bias tee turned on. The LNA was connected directly to the dongle, with no coax in between. The patch antenna was angled to point towards the Inmarsat satellite. A 5 meter USB extension cord was then used to interface with a PC. The images below demonstrate the performance we were able to get.

Outernet Signal

Outernet Signal

Outernet Signal with 4x Decimation

Outernet Signal with 4x Decimation

AERO

AERO

STD-C EGC

STD-C EGC

Loading image... Loading image... Loading image... Loading image...

The Outernet team writes that a SNR level of only 2 dB is needed for decoding to work on their signal. With the patch and LNA we were able to get at least 12 dB so this is more than good enough. Other signals such as AERO and STD-C EGC also came in very strongly. Even when not angled at the satellite and placed flat on a table it was able to receive the signal with about 5 dB’s of SNR.

In conclusion the patch and LNA worked very well at receiving the Outernet signal as well as AERO and STD-C EGC. We think these products are great value for money if you are interested in these L-Band signals, and they make it very easy to receive. The only minor problem with the patch antenna is that there is no stand for it, which makes it difficult to mount in a way that faces the satellite. However this issue can easily be fixed with some sellotape and your own mount.

In the future once the Outernet Rpi3 OS and decoder image is released we hope to show a demonstration and tutorial on receiving Outernet data.