Tagged: std-c

Testing out the SDR-Kits L-band Inmarsat Patch Antenna for AERO

The SDR-Kits L-band Patch antenna is a modified GPS antenna designed for receiving Inmarsat satellite stations such as AERO and STD-C. They have another version for receiving Iridium frequencies as well. The patch costs £12.90 inc VAT in UK, or approx US$14 for non-UK customers. 

Over on his channel Frugal Radio has uploaded a video where he tests this patch antenna with an RTL-SDR Blog V3. The built in bias tee on the V3 is used to power the antenna. In the video he shows how he's able to receive and decode AERO using the JAERO decoding software and how he uses a a metal backing to improve reception.

SDR-Kits frugal L-band Inmarsat patch antenna review decoding CPDLC ADS-C with RTL-SDR v3 dongle!

YouTube Series on Inmarsat Decoding with Scytale-C

Paul (microp11) is the programmer behind the Scytale-C Inmarsat decoder which has become very popular with RTL-SDR owners. With Scytale-C, and RTL-SDR and an appropriate L-band antenna and amplifier it is possible to receive STD-C NCS data from Inmarsat satellites. This is a public broadcast which contains information like search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather, pirate activity and other incident reports. If you're interested, we have a tutorial available here which uses different software.

Paul has recently created a 6-part video series explaining Scytale-C and all it's features. As well as showing how to setup a Scytale-C decoder with the SDR# plugin in order to receive the STD-C text data via the UI, Paul's series goes into more depth showing how to review and inspect the raw data packets, how to monitor multiple Inmarsat channels at once using SDR# Spyservers and how to use the map feature for plotting coordinate and region data.

Inmarsat-C decoder Scytale-C Part II

Testing a PCB Patch Antenna and Radiosonde QFH Antenna for Inmarsat and Iridium Reception

Over on his YouTube channel Tech Minds has been testing some antennas for Inmarsat and Iridium L-Band satellite reception. Inmarsat is a satellite service that runs on geostationary satellites, and one can be received from almost anywhere in the world. There are various services, but the ones that are easily decodable are STD-C EGC and AERO. EGC contains text information search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather and incident reports, and AERO is a form of satellite ACARS, and typically contains short messages from aircraft.

In the first video Tech Minds tests what appears to be an as of yet unreleased prototype PCB patch antenna being designed by NooElec. The PCB patch antenna is combined with a SAWBird Inmarsat LNA and an RTL-SDR. With it he's able to receive STD-C and AERO signals.

In the second video Tech Minds tests an L-Band QFH antenna salvaged from a Vaisala weather balloon radiosonde. The QFH is designed for GPS frequencies, but can potentially be used at the slightly higher Inmarsat and Iridium frequencies. Tech Minds combines the QFH antenna with a SAWBird Inmarsat LNA, but unfortunately finds that reception is too weak for any AERO decoding to be possible. However, when used on the higher Iridium frequencies the antenna works well, and he's able to decode packets with Iridium Toolkit.

New Inmarsat Antenna from NooElec

Testing A QFH Antenna For Inmarsat And Iridium

RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Antenna Preview

We note that over the last several months we have been working on our own L-band patch antenna that will cover Inmarsat, GPS and Iridium frequencies all in one. We expect manufacturing to be completed near the end of the month, or early next month.

The antenna is a ceramic patch, and will come in a waterproof enclosure. It will be possible to easily mount the antenna on a window or elsewhere using the standard suction cup and bendy legs tripod included with our dipole kits. Target price is US$39.95 including the suction cup, tripod, 2M coax and shipping, but we may have it initially on sale for a lower price.

This is cheaper than buying an Inmarsat & Iridium LNA, but a bit more than the SDR-Kits patches that they brought out a few weeks ago. Although performance of our patch is much better. Keep an eye out for the initial information post coming in the next few days.

RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Preview (RTL-SDR for Scale)
RTL-SDR Blog L-Band Patch Preview (RTL-SDR for Scale)

Mike Tests out L-Band STD-C and AERO with a Low Cost Modified GPS Antenna

SDR-Kits.net have begun selling low cost GPS antennas that are modified to receive the Inmarsat satellite frequencies between 1535 MHz to 1550 MHz. They also have a version for Iridium satellites that receives 1610 MHz to 1630 MHz. The antennas are powered by a 3-5V bias tee, so they should work fine with SDRplay, Airspy and RTL-SDR Blog V3 units.

Mike Ladd from SDRplay has recently sent us a guide to receiving AERO and STD-C messages on L-band with the SDR-Kits antenna and an SDRPlay unit running SDRUno (Megaupload link).

AERO messages are a form of satellite ACARS, and typically contain short messages from aircraft. It is also possible to receive AERO audio calls. STD-C aka FleetNET and SafetyNET is a marine service that broadcasts messages that typically contain text information such as search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather and incident reports. Some private messages are also seen. To decode AERO Mike uses JAERO, and for STD-C he uses the Tekmanoid STD-C decoder.

Mike has also created a very handy bank of frequencies for the SDRUno frequency manager which can be downloaded from here.

We note that if you're interested in waiting, at the end of September we will have an L-band patch antenna set available too. Our antenna will work from 1525 up to 1637 MHz. Prototypes have shown have shown good Inmarsat, Iridium and GPS reception. More details coming next month when manufacturing gets closer to finishing up.

Screenshot of the Tekmanoid Decoder from Mikes Tutorial
Screenshot of the Tekmanoid Decoder from Mikes Tutorial

SignalsEverywhere: Decoding Inmarsat EGC and AERO ACARS

On his latest video Corrosive from the SignalsEverywhere YouTube channel discusses Inmarsat LES EGC and AERO ACARS decoding. Inmarsat is a satellite provider that has multiple geosynchronous satellites that can be received from almost anywhere in the world at around 1.5 GHz with an RTL-SDR and appropriate antenna + LNA. Inmarsat EGC and AERO are two channels on Inmarsat satellites that can easily be decoded.

The Enhanced Group Call (EGC) messages typically contain text information such as search and rescue (SAR) and coast guard messages as well as news, weather and incident reports. AERO messages on the other hand are a form of satellite ACARS, and typically contain short messages from aircraft. More interestingly with a bit of work compiling audio decoders, it is also possible to listen in to AERO C-Channel conversations, which is an emergency phone call service available on some aircraft.

In his video Corrosive gives an overview and demonstration of EGC and AERO reception.

Inmarsat LES EGC and AERO ACARS Decoding

Creating an Inmarsat STC-C EGC Live Stream with an RTL-SDR, Raspberry Pi and OpenWebRX

Thanks to Zoltan (aka Veryokay on YouTube) for submitting information about his Inmarsat STD-C EGC live stream setup. His setup allows him to access the Inmarsat STD-C signal from anywhere in the world over the internet, thanks to the use of an OpenWebRX server. Inmarsat STD-C is a geostationary satellite service that provides information for search and rescue, as well as news, weather and incident reports for mariners. We have a tutorial from a few years ago which shows some example messages. OpenWebRX is an efficient SDR streaming server platform that allows you to access RTL-SDR's and other SDRs from anywhere in the world via an internet connection.

In his setup Zoltan uses a Raspberry Pi 3, RTL-SDR Blog V3, L-band LNA and L-band antenna for receiving and processing the signal. Power is provided via a Power over Ethernet (PoE) adapter, and the whole thing is placed outside, in a weatherproof plastic lunchbox.

The video shows the hardware, and then goes on to describe the software setup, along with a demonstration of the OpenWebRX stream. More information as well as the link to his publicly accessible OpenWebRX Inamrsat STD-C stream can be found on his blog post.

INMARSAT STD-C EGC live streaming

SDR# Inmarsat Decoder Plugin Now Available

Microp11, the programmer of Scytale-C a standalone Inmarsat decoder has just released a new Inmarsat decoder SDR# plugin. The plugin is currently in the "pre-alpha" stages, so is still missing some functionality and may be buggy. However, it does appear to be functional at this point in time. It can be used with RTL-SDRs, and any other SDR# compatible SDR including units running on remote SpyServers. Microp11 writes:

  • I ran it with SDR# version v1.0.0.1761.
  • If it crashes you SDR# I apologize in advance.
  • The auto-tracking (default on) will alter your SDR# frequency and follow the signal’s CF. When the SNR is very low, please disable it and manually tune the SDR# to try to get the CF as close to 2000 as possible.The demodulator still has plenty ideas of its own.
  • Use USB mode with 4000 Hz bandwidth.
  • For now the interface is missing the usual scatter plots.
  • UDP Address and UDP Port are for sending the decoded frames to the Scytale-C UI.
  • Offset and CF are the difference from zero error and the CF frequency of the demodulated BPSK signal.
  • Tx and SYM are the transmitted over UDP frames and SYM is showing the number of demodulated symbols.
  • A bunch of libraries are attached as extra files. Please be gentle and accept the package as it. Will clean-up in the future.
  • Use in conjunction with the Scytale-C UI from the archive: “x64-UI1.6-Decoder1.4.zip” (link below)
  • The magic line is included in the archive: “SDRSharp.ScytaleC-1.0-alpha.zip”

The files can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/scytalec/scytalec/downloads.

SDRSharp Scytale-C Plugin
SDRSharp Scytale-C Plugin

Outernet’s Old Antenna Stock for Sale: L-Band Active and Filtered Ceramic Patch Antennas

In the past the Outernet project operated on L-band frequencies, and for the service they manufactured a number of active L-band active ceramic patch antennas for use with RTL-SDR dongles. Outernet has since moved on to faster Ku-band delivery, and hence their old L-band antennas can no longer be used for their service.  There are a few of these patch antennas left over in Outernet's stock and they are currently selling them on eBay for US $29 + shipping.

Although no longer useful for Outernet, these antennas are still very useful for receiving other L-band services such as STD-C SafetyNET and AERO. SafetyNET is a text broadcast intended for sailors at sea, but contains many interesting and potentially useful messages for others too. Often they transmit data like military sea live firing warnings, reports of marine pirate activity, search and rescue reports, scientific vessel reports as well as weather reports. AERO is the satellite version of ACARS, and is used by aircraft to communicate with text messages to and from ground stations. L-Band AERO signals only contain information from the ground station up to the aircraft. For air to ground you'll need a C-band receiver set up. AERO is the satellite communications protocol that was so heavily centered on during the MH370 flight disappearance investigation.

In the past we've reviewed the Outernet L-band ceramic patch and found it to work very well. Certainly STD-C and AERO signals are easy to receive with the antenna if you point it at the satellite. The antenna requires bias tee power and can easily be used in combination with the bias tee on our RTL-SDR V3 dongles. The onboard filter helps reduce problems from interfering signals, but restricts reception to 1525 - 1559 MHz, so Iridium signals cannot be received with this antenna.

The L-Band Active Ceramic Patch Antenna.
The L-Band Active and Filtered Ceramic Patch Antenna.