Two Videos Showing the LimeSDR on HF in SDR-Console V3

The LimeSDR is a RX/TX capable SDR with a 100 kHz – 3.8 GHz frequency range, 12-bit ADC and 61.44 MHz bandwidth. It costs $299 USD and we think it is going to be an excellent next generation upgrade to SDR’s with similar price and functionality like the HackRF and bladeRF. Back in August we posted how they had added HF functionality to their drivers, and posted some videos from LimeSDR beta tester Marty Wittrock who had gotten HF working well  in GQRX.

Now that SDR-Console has added support for the LimeSDR and HF reception, Marty has uploaded two new videos showing it in action. The first video shows some SSB reception on 40M and the second shows some CW reception on 20M. Marty runs SDR-Console on a MSI Core i5 Cube PC. Marty also writes:

Even with the ‘older’ LimeSDRs that I have that don’t have the proposed modified matching networks on them the performance at 20m and 40m was actually REALLY good for voice and CW. Obviously if the band conditions for 15m and 10m were better the days that I tested the LimeSDR it would have been even better since ‘as-designed’ matching networks seem to do better at 30 MHz and up. Checking the performance at 162.475 MHz (my local Cedar Rapids, Iowa NOAA Weather Station) the performance is excellent on a VHF antenna.

The LimeSDR on 40m Phone using SDRConsole V3.0
LimeSDR Operating on the HF 20m Band with SDRConsole V3.0

 

9 comments

  1. Tylor A

    If anyone want to buy hackrf blue I am selling one. I bough from my friend and i feel like i do not need two hackrf so if anyone need one leave comment. I will give you private email

  2. Marty Wittrock

    PA3BTS – No matter if you run Linux (Ubuntu or one of the Ubuntu derivatives) or Windows you’ll need something on the order of a quad-core 3.0 GHz with 8GB of RAM. I use a Dell 3020 (quad core i5) for most of my Linux apps that run well with the LimeSDR and I’m currently using a quad core i5 cube PC (MSI Cubi) that operates at 2.7 GHz and has 4GB RAM and running Windows 10 with SDRConsole V3.0 and you can see the results in the videos that this post is all about – that’s the Cubi i5 with the specs I just mentioned running SDRConsole V3.0 with the LimeSDR. It’s loaded to about 70% (not real optimal) but I’m really pushing it with a cube PC – – but it gets the job done. It would probably do better with 8GB of RAM and I’m going to add that within a week or so. Also, my Dell 3020 (3.0 GHz and 8GB RAM) running Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial) and GQRX runs incredibly fast and is not taxed at all (less than 25% loading) using the LimeSDR. Hope this information helps – 73 de Marty, KN0CK

  3. PA3BTS

    Hi,

    Can you give information on computer specs versus computer load of the Lime SDR?
    Do you need much processor power and memory for the Lime?

    73, Cornel

    • Marty Wittrock

      Cornel – No matter if you run Linux (Ubuntu or one of the Ubuntu derivatives) or Windows you’ll need something on the order of a quad-core 3.0 GHz with 8GB of RAM. I use a Dell 3020 (quad core i5) for most of my Linux apps that run well with the LimeSDR and I’m currently using a quad core i5 cube PC (MSI Cubi) that operates at 2.7 GHz and has 4GB RAM and running Windows 10 with SDRConsole V3.0 and you can see the results in the videos that this post is all about – that’s the Cubi i5 with the specs I just mentioned running SDRConsole V3.0 with the LimeSDR. It’s loaded to about 70% (not real optimal) but I’m really pushing it with a cube PC – – but it gets the job done. It would probably do better with 8GB of RAM and I’m going to add that within a week or so. Also, my Dell 3020 (3.0 GHz and 8GB RAM) running Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial) and GQRX runs incredibly fast and is not taxed at all (less than 25% loading) using the LimeSDR. Hope this information helps – 73 de Marty, KN0CK

      • PA3BTS

        Hi Marty,

        Thanks for the reply. This gives a good indication on required processor power and memory.
        Hope the shipment of LimeSDR’s will begin soon, I have one on order…

        73, Cornel

  4. Animal Cracker

    Hi guys I am new to sdr community so excuse my noobness
    I saw old post talking about limesdr and just wonder is it compatible with sdr#?
    and does it have a lot of tutorial so I can follow?
    Any recommandation

    • Marty Wittrock

      Animal Cracker – The LimeSDR isn’t currently supported on SDR# or any of the ‘ExtIO’-style Windows applications. The LimeSDR is currently supported in Windows using SDRConsole V3.0 only (that will change as there are drivers written for the HDSDR and SDR# apps – they just aren’t being addressed now). In terms of Linux (Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial) the applications are supported through the SoapySDR drivers that Josh Blum developed and are extensible to GQRX, GNU Radio Companion, and Pothos as the apps that support the LimeSDR for receive and transmit. GNU Radio Companion and Pothos are typically for researchers, while GQRX was developed by Alex Csete for the purpose of multi-purpose receive (wideband, narrowband AM, FM, SSB, CW). Again, right now in the Windows applications only SDRConsole V3.0 supports the LimeSDR, but I’m sure once it get into the hands of the 1200+ backers that purchased boards that the LimeSDR will blow the doors off the development world and more applications like HDSDR and SDR# will support LimeSDR.

        • Marty Wittrock

          Animal Cracker – I think it’s a great idea to enter SDR with the LimeSDR because of the quality of the product you get (the supported 61.44 MHz RF bandwidth is incredibly good compared to other SDRs), supported apps, the various OSs that support the LimeSDR (Linux and Windows) and the overall performance over its usable range (100 kHz to 3.8 GHz). Here is a link to compare/contrast the other SDRs to the LimeSDR (scroll down to the middle of the page in the link for that info):

          https://www.crowdsupply.com/lime-micro/limesdr

          I have a HackRF Blue (no different than HackRF), a Red Pitaya, RTL-SDR, and a Flex 5000A and I would put the LimeSDR as more capable than the HackRF (and better support for that matter), better overall frequency coverage for receive and transmit to the Red Pitaya, better overall frequency coverage and RF Bandwidth than the RTL-SDR, and better quality/compactness with better receive/transmit frequency range to the Flex 5000A (but the Flex has 100W output, where the LimeSDR has only 10mW).

          Again, look over the specs of the other SDRs out there on the link I sent you – you won’t be making a mistake by making the LimeSDR your first – and best – SDR to use for transceiver applications. Also, here is the link to the MyriadRF website that has A LOT of LimeSDR applications happening:

          https://myriadrf.org/projects/limesdr/

          Have fun and thanks for writing back..!

          73 de Marty, KN0CK

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