Tagged: malachite-dsp

A Hi-Z to 50 Ohm Impedance Matching Transformer for Improving HF/SW Reception

Thank you to Mitsunobu for writing in and sharing news about the release of his new product which is a Hi-Z (high impedance) to 50 Ohm matching transformer. This transformer allows you to use small antennas such as short telescopic whips for HF/SW reception on software defined radios.

Generally for HF reception you would want to use a full sized antenna, which can be many meters long and certainly not portable. However, by using an high impedance transformer it becomes possible to use smaller portable antennas. Reception with a small antenna and transformer will still be suboptimal compared to a full sized HF antenna, however, if the signals are strong enough the transformer will allow you to receive them decently.

In the tests shown on his blog (in Japanese, use Google Translate) he shows how the transformer adapter can be connected to a small telescopic whip and Malachite DSP SDR for portable use. Later he also shows how the adapter can make our Dipole Kit antenna work well for HF on a RTL-SDR Blog V3 with direct sampling.  

The product is only available via Amazon in Japan. However, Mitsunobu notes that Amazon.jp offers international shipping. He offers the transformer by itself, and a version including a short telescopic whip antenna.

Hi-Z to 50 Ohm Antenna Transformer for HF/SWL

The Malachite-DSP: A $195 Russian Made Portable Wideband SDR Receiver with Touch Screen

Over on the SWLing.com blog we've seen news about the release of a new Russian designed and made portable software defined radio called the "Malachite-DSP". The Malachite-DSP is an "all-in-one" portable SDR that is controlled via a touch screen and two control knobs. It covers 0.1 MHz to 1000 MHz with a bandwidth of up to 160 kHz, and the custom software supports all common modulation types. The whole device consumes 300mA and is powered by a Li-ion cell. It's marketed as a modern DEGEN and TECSUN replacement, so it appears to be targeting the HF short wave listening (SWL) customer.

Production appears to be small, with purchasing currently done by contacting RX9CIM, one of the project creators, directly at his email address (details on this forum post). The cost for a fully assembled unit is 12500 Russian Rubles which is 195 USD (not including international shipping). You can also purchase just the PCB without components for 1100 Rubles (17 USD). Importantly the forum post notes to watch out for scammers, who appear to be trying to take fake preorders for the device.

From the components list we can see that this SDR runs on the MSI001 tuner chip, which is the same tuner chip used in the SDRplay line of units. However, unlike the SDRplay units which use a wideband MSi2500 ADC, the Malachite-DSP uses an audio chip as the RF ADC. This provides a 16-bit ADC, resulting in high dynamic range, but at the expense of the available bandwidth which is only 160 kHz. A STM32H743VIT6 with ARM Cortex A7 processor runs what appears to be custom DSP and GUI software. The software doesn't seem to support DRM, but AM, WFM, NFM, LSB, USB are all supported.

The main place for news and discussion on the Malachite-DSP appears to be on a Russian ham radio forum thread. Judging by the fact that the schematic, software and BOM is all freely released, the project appears to be open source. There is also a group on the Russian Facebook clone vk.com where some discussion is occurring.

The YouTube videos below are by a Russian reviewers. Be sure to turn on the YouTube closed captioning and auto translation feature if you want to follow along in English.

😲ПРИЕМНИК КОТОРЫЙ ЛОВИТ ВСЁ!!!💥🔝 ЭТО ВАМ НЕ Degen и Tecsun ВСТРЕЧАЙТЕ НОВЫЙ МАЛАХИТ DSP V2💯🆕

SDR приемник МАЛАХИТ DSP

The Malachite-DSP reminds us a bit of the unreleased PantronX Titus II SDR, which is supposed to be a low cost (aiming for less than $100 USD) 100 kHz - 2 GHz tablet screen based SDR that was supposed to make DRM reception more popular. However the Titus II hardware has never eventuated since it's initial news in 2016, and at this time appears to be a dead project.