Tagged: panadapter

Connecting an RTL-SDR Panadapter to a uBITX Transceiver

The uBITX is a US$129 HF SSB/CW QRP transceiver kit that works from 3 MHz to 30 MHz with up to 10W TX power. It's a fully analogue radio, but it can be combined with an RTL-SDR to create a panadapter display thanks to a tutorial released by KD8CEC.

The method requires that you use the custom CEC firmware, or modify other firmware,  as this appears to change the output frequency at the tap point. The tap point is made accessible by soldering on an extra SMA connector for the RTL-SDR to connect to. The rest of the work is entirely performed in the uBITX software manager, Omni-Rig and SDR-Console V3.

uBITX with RTL-SDR Panadapter
uBITX with RTL-SDR Panadapter

An Enhanced Version of Freqshow for Raspberry Pi’s with Touch Screens

The Freqshow software is an RTL-SDR compatible tool for Raspberry Pi devices that can render live spectrum and waterfall displays. It is designed to run on portable touchscreens that plug into the Raspberry Pi. We've posted about freqshow a few times in the past.

Recently Dan Stixrud has created an enhanced version of Freqshow. Over on the his post on the Adafruit forums, Dan explains the improvements as follows:

The additional features are many. Additional features include: Full resolution zooming, I and Q Swap, 9 different pre FFT windowing functions to choose from. Center frequency offset or shift. PPM correction for the RTL2832. FFT averaging or FFT peaking. Easy frequency up and down from main screen. Easy Scale adjustment from main screen.

On YouTube he's also posted a video that demonstrates the software in action when running on an Adafruit 2.8" and Pi Foundation 7" TFT capacitive touch screen. Dan uses the software as a panadapter for his ham radio.

WQ7Tpanadapter

Using the RTL-SDR as a Panadapter for the IC-751A

A panadapter is a device that connects to a standard hardware radio and allows you to visually see the RF signals on a waterfall. Since SDR’s run on the PC, they naturally have the ability to display a panadapter screen, and most software like SDR#, HDSDR and SDR-Console already provide this. The RTL-SDR can also be used to add panadapter capabilities to a regular hardware radio. 

Gary Rondeau has been using the RTL-SDR as a panadapter for his IC-751A, which is a high quality ham radio transceiver. In his first post, Gary shows how he connected the RTL-SDR in a block diagram, and then shows how he interfaces the RTL-SDR and IC-751A together using HDSDR and the Omnirig software.

Block diagram showing the RTL-SDR as a Panadapter with the IC-751A and HDSDR.
Block diagram showing the RTL-SDR as a Panadapter with the IC-751A and HDSDR.

In his second post he shows a comparison between decoding JT65 and JT9 signals directly from the IC-751A audio output, vs via the RTL-SDR & HDSDR panadapter connection. His results show that as long as there is sufficient signal level, the RTL-SDR as a panadapter can match the performance of the raw IC-751A audio output, even producing less signal splatter on strong signals due to the pure numerical vs analogue mixing strategies of SDRs vs analogue radios.

RTL-SDR (top) vs raw audio from IC-751A below. RTL-SDR has a wider bandwidth, and less splatter at 2200 kHz when the strong signal came in.
RTL-SDR (top) vs raw audio from IC-751A below. RTL-SDR has a wider bandwidth, and less splatter at 2200 kHz when the strong signal came in.

Finally, in his third post he shows some more benefits of using the RTL-SDR as a panadapter, including rapid SSB tuning, RFI identification and signatures, helping work a pile up, monitor SSB net while working PSK on the parent radio, monitor the JT65 & JT9 band while working PSK – or vise versa and finally leave the radios on and monitor PSK, RTTY, JT65 & JT9 traffic for PSK Reporter.

Using a direct sampling enabled Airspy as a Panadapter for a Yaesu FTDX-5000

Tim Havens is an avid CW operator on the ham bands and primarily uses his Yaesu FTDX-5000 transceiver for this purpose. At the same time he also uses a software defined radio coupled with an upconverter as a panadapter by connecting the SDR to the 9 MHz IF output of the Yaesu.

However a problem Tim encountered was that the frequency drift of any SDR he tried was too large, even with a TCXO based software defined radio (like a modded RTL-SDR or the Airspy), and that it was a constant hassle to recalibrate. Furthermore, he noticed that the upconverters he used introduced their own drift which just added to the overall frequency drift.

To get around this Tim decided to use the Airspy in a special configuration. First he used the external clock input of the Airspy to connect to his Jackson Labs “Fury” GPSDO. This device uses GPS satellites to generate a very accurate 10 MHz clock, with almost zero drift. Secondly, to get around the need for an upconverter with it’s own frequency drift he used the ADC1 direct sampling input ports on the Airspy to connect to the 9MHz IF output of his FTDX-5000 through an extra band pass filter and LNA.

Tim writes that he will soon update his post with more images and a video.

Airspy with external GPS clock and ADC1 output connected.
Airspy with external GPS clock and ADC1 output connected.

A 1961 Drake 2B Receiver using an RTL-SDR as a Panadapter

The Drake 2B is an old analogue tube based radio from 1961. Although it is so old it is still considered a decent shortwave receiver. Over on YouTube user M0HBR decided to bring his Drake into the modern age by coupling it with a panadapter made from an RTL-SDR dongle. A panadapter is a device that allows you to view the RF spectrum and waterfall of a normal radio. 

To do this he tapped into the 455 kHz IF output of the Drake and amplified it with a homebrew FET source-follower, before connecting it to the RTL-SDR. He then uses the HDSDR software to listen to and display the received signals on the waterfall.

Drake Dongle Derring-Do — 2B Goes SDR

RTL-SDR Panadapter Using Hardware Radio Receiver IF Stages

Over on YouTube user Jay Moore has uploaded a video explaining how to connect an RTL-SDR dongle to the IF stage of a hardware radio in order to create a panadapter. In the video Jay briefly explains how a radio with an IF stage works and then shows how he tapped into his Sansui 2000 hardware radio’s IF stage directly from the circuit board. The IF stage then connects to a ham-it-up upconverter which connects to the RTL-SDR.

By connecting the IF stage of a hardware radio to the RTL-SDR it is possible to use the hardware radio as the receiver while using the RTL-SDR to still maintain the benefits of a spectrum display. Most purpose built hardware radios will have better reception than the RTL-SDR.

RTL-SDR on receiver IF stages

Using the RTL-SDR as a Panadapter

PW2VLW’s shows on his blog how to adapt an Icom IC-706 hardware radio to be able to use an RTL-SDR as a cheap panadapter (Note site is in Portuguese, so use Google Translate). A panadapter is device that allows you to visually see the RF spectrum and waterfall being received by the ham radio.

He shows instructions on how to perform the required modification to get the IF output of the ICOM, and also shows how to interface the PC with the ICOM so that it may be controlled directly via HDSDR.

Panadapter
Panadapter

RTL-SDR as a Cheap Panadapter

For people already with expensive ham radios, the RTL-SDR can be used as a cheap panadapter. A panadapter is device that allows you to visually see the RF spectrum and waterfall being received by the ham radio. There are multiple (expensive) commercial panadapters available, but combined with a PC or laptop, the RTL-SDR will work just as well.

In this video YouTube user akdude47 shows a tutorial on setting up the RTL-SDR as a panadapter for a Yaesu FT-857. The setup involves connecting the IF output of the radio to the RTL-SDR, and putting in some settings into HDSDR.

How to setup a RTL SDR with HDSDR and a FT-857 for a panadapter and second receiver.