Tagged: security

HackRF Receives Negative Press in the UK’s ‘DailyMail’ Newspaper

The HackRF is a $300 USD RX/TX capable software defined radio which has a wide tuning range from almost DC – 6 GHz, and wide bandwidths of up to 20 MHz. It uses an 8-bit ADC so reception quality is not great, but most people buy it for its TX and wide frequency/bandwidth capabilities.

Recently the HackRF received some negative press in the ‘Daily Mail’, a British tabloid newspaper famous for sensationalist articles. In the article the Daily Mail show that the HackRF can be used to break into £100,000 Range Rover car in less than two minutes. The exact method of attack isn’t revealed, but we assume they did some sort of simple replay attack. What they probably did is take the car key far away out of reception range from the car, record a key press using the HackRF, and then replay that key press close to the car with the HackRF’s TX function. Taking the key out of reception range of the car prevents the car from invalidating the rolling code when the key is pressed. 

Of course in real life an attacker would need to be more sophisticated as they most likely wouldn’t have access to the keyfob, and in that case they would most likely perform a jam-record-replay attack as we’ve seen with cheap homemade devices like RollJam. The HackRF cannot do this by itself because it is only half-duplex and so cannot TX and RX at the same time.

We should also mention that the HackRF is not the only device that can be used for replay attacks – potentially any radio that can transmit at the keyfob frequency could be used. Even a very cheap Arduino with ISM band RF module can be used for the same purpose.

Opening Car Doors with an RTL-SDR, Arduino and CC1101 Transceiver

Recently we found this post from last year by security researcher Anthony which shows how an RTL-SDR combined with an Arduino and CC1101 transceiver can be used to open a car. The technique he presents is the jam, intercept and replay technique which was also used by Samy Kamkars Rolljam device

Most modern vehicles use some form of rolling code security on their wireless keyfobs to prevent unauthorized replay attacks. When the car owner presses a button on the keyfob, a unique rolling code is sent to the car. If it matches the codes stored in the car, the car will unlock and then invalidate that code so it can never be used again, thus preventing a replay attack. On the next press the keyfob sends a new code. This system can be defeated simply by jamming the car keyfob receiver, and using a more selective receiver to record the keyfob unlock packet, then replaying those packets at a later time.

The technique Anthony presents has the attacker use an Arduino with CC1101 transceiver as the jammer. Jamming is totally illegal within the USA, so Anthony does not show exactly how to do the jamming. While the signal is being jammed, the RTL-SDR captures and saves the signal from the keyfob. Later the signal is processed in GNU Radio to remove the jamming signal and extract the keyfob signal. He then uses GNU Radio to demodulate the ASK signal into a binary modulated waveform that he can replay later.

Anthony tested this technique on two cars and a truck and was successful at unlocking the doors all three times.

RTL-SDR receiving a BMW keyfob signal at 315 MHz in HDSDR.
RTL-SDR receiving a BMW keyfob signal at 315 MHz in HDSDR.

Identifying Issues that can be used to Disable IoT Alarms

Seekintoo cybersecurity researcher Dayton Pidhirney has been investigating security flaws in wireless IoT (Internet of Things) based alarm systems, and has identified six issues that can be used to bypass or disable an alarm. Five attack the RF portion of the IoT device, and one through the traditional IP network.

In his post he specifically attacks the iSmartAlarm (ISM). This is an IoT home alarm system that comes with several sensors, and can be controlled via an app on your smartphone. The unit uses the Texas Instruments CC1110 RF SoC, which implements the SimpliciTI low-power radio network protocol. Dayton notes that the majority of attacks not specific to a single manufacturer, and could be applied to other IoT devices as well.

Using a variety of hardware including a logic analyzer, Yardstick One, GoodFET, RFCat, USRP B210 software defined radio and several pieces of software including GNU Radio, GQRX, Baudline, Audacity, Dayton was able attack the alarm in the following ways:

  • Brute-force attack on the alarm system device source addresses.
  • Remotely clone authenticated devices used to interact with the alarm system security features.
  • Decryption of authenticated devices radio communications, allowing remote attackers to craft packets used to send arbitrary commands to the alarm system.
  • RF Jamming.
  • Assisted replay attack.

The post goes into deep detail on the methods he used to reverse engineer the device and is a great tutorial for anyone wanting to get into wireless IoT security research.

The iSmartAlarm IoT wireless alarm system
The iSmartAlarm IoT wireless alarm system

Explaining the Dallas Siren Hack

If you’ve been paying attention to the news then you might have heard of the recent Dallas tornado siren hack. Earlier in the month a hacker took control of 156 tornado warning sirens placed all around the city of Dallas, Texas in the United States. The sirens are activated via an RF control signal, and the hacker transmitted the control signal, causing all the sirens to activate causing a city wide false alarm. The attack could have been performed with a transmit capable software defined radio like the HackRF, or any other transmit capable radio such as a handheld radio.

Bastille is a wireless security firm which specializes in RF, SDR and IoT. Over on their blog, employee Balint Seeber has uploaded a video and blog post that discusses some possibilities on how the hacker may have activated the sirens.

In the blog post and video first Balint discusses the difference between a single frequency network, and a repeated network. In a single frequency network, one powerful transmitter up on a hill would be used to activate all the sirens, whereas with a repeater network several dispersed transmitters might be used to repeat the signal over a wide area.

He then discusses the difference between an analog and digital command transmission system. In an analog command transmission a simple series of tones might be used to activate the sirens. In this case the hacker could simply listen for the tones when the siren is activated during the monthly test, and save them away for a future replay attack. In a digital system instead of tones an encrypted packet of data could be used instead. Depending on how the encryption is implemented this could prevent a replay attack.

USBee: Leaking Data from Air-Gapped Computers and Receiving it with an RTL-SDR

This Monday researchers from Ben-Gurion University of Negev released an academic paper detailing their research in showing how attackers could cause your PC to wirelessly leak data. They write that usually covertly modified USB devices are required to leak data, as is the case with the NSA’s COTTONMOUTH device which is detailed in their ANT catalog. However, the innovation from these researchers is that their own implementation can be used to turn any unmodified USB device into a make shift transmitter.

The attack works by first infecting a computer with their malware software. The malware then utilizes the USB data bus to create electromagnetic emissions on a connected USB device. In these tests they use a USB flash drive and write a file to the device in such a way that the emissions produced are transmitting decodable data. They write that any binary data can be modulated and transmitted to a nearby receiver, such as an RTL-SDR dongle. Data rates can reach up to 80 bytes/s.  The data is modulated with binary frequency shift keying, and their receiver code is implemented in GNU Radio.

This story has also been featured on arstechnica and threatpost. The video below demonstrates the attack.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=19&v=E28V1t-k8Hk

Unlocking Almost Any Vehicle with an SDR or Arduino

Earlier this week wired.com released a story indicating that researchers from the University of Birmingham have discovered two vulnerabilities that can be used to unlock almost any car. The first vulnerability concerns Volkswagen Group vehicles (VW, Audi, SEAT, Skoda) sold since 1995. Essentially their research found that the keyless entry systems of VW Group vehicles relies only on a few global master keys which they have been able to recover through reverse engineering of an undisclosed component used in a VW car. Then by sniffing the wireless key’s signal with an RF module or SDR like the RTL-SDR or HackRF they are able to recover the cryptographic algorithms used and then using the global key clone the wireless key signal, which can then be re-transmitted with a simple Arduino.

In their second research findings, the researcher’s write how they have been able to crack the Hitag2 rolling code system which is used in many vehicles such as Alfa Romeo, Chevrolet, Citroen, Dacia, Fiat, Ford, Lancia, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Opel, Peugot and Renault. Again, the hack works by sniffing a few wireless keyfob rolling code signals with an SDR or other device. Once the signals have been sniffed a simple laptop computer can reportedly break the encryption within one minute.

Here are some interesting excerpts from the conclusions of the paper:

The results of this paper show that major manufacturers have used insecure schemes over more than 20 years. Due to the widespread use of the analyzed systems, our findings have worldwide impact. Owners of affected vehicles should be aware that unlocking the doors of their car is much simpler than commonly assumed today. Both for the VW Group and the Hitag2 rolling code schemes, it is possible to clone the original remote control and gain unauthorized access to the vehicle after eavesdropping one or a few rolling codes, respectively. The necessary equipment to receive and send rolling codes, for example SDRs like the USRP or HackRF and off-the-shelf RF modules like the TI Chronos smart watch, are widely available at low cost.

A successful attack on the RKE and anti-theft system would also enable or facilitate other crimes:

– theft of the vehicle itself by circumventing the immobilizer system or by programming a new key into the car via the OBD port with a suitable tool

– compromising the board computer of a modern vehicle, which may even affect personal safety, e.g., by deactivating the brakes while switching on the wiping system in a bend

– inconspicuously placing an object or a person inside the car. The car could be locked again after the act

– on-the-road robbery, affecting the personal safety of the driver or passengers if they (incorrectly) assume that the vehicle is securely locked

Note that due to the long range of RKE systems it is technically feasible to eavesdrop the signals of all cars on a parking lot or at a car dealer by placing an eavesdropping device there overnight. Afterwards, all vulnerable cars could be opened by the adversary. Practical experiments suggest that the receiving ranges can be substantially increased: The authors of [18] report eavesdropping of a 433 MHz RFID system, with technology comparable to RKE, from up to 1 km using low-cost equipment.

The findings were presented at the Usenix Advanced Computing Systems Association conference during August 10-12, 2016 in Austin, TX. The white paper is titled “Lock It and Still Lose It—On the (In)Security of Automotive Remote Keyless Entry Systems” and can be downloaded here. Of course they did not publish the actual VW master keys in their paper and they have notified VW and NXP who make the Hitag2 chips in advance, noting that Hitag2 had actually been broken for several years prior.

Back in February we showed how Smay Kamkar was able to bypass rolling codes with his RollJam device, however the findings by these researcher’s is different in that they are actually able to generate new rolling codes, such that a simple Arduino with transmitter can act as a second wireless remote.

A $40 Arduino which can be used to record wireless rolling codes, then transmit new ones once cracked.
A $40 Arduino which can be used to record wireless rolling codes, then transmit new ones once the encryption has been broken.

Stealing a Drone with Software Defined Radio

PHDays (Positive Hack Days) is a yearly forum with a focus on ethical hacking and security. During this years forum which took place in June, the organizers set up a competition where the goal was to “steal” or take control of a Syma X8C quadcopter drone. The drone runs on the nRF24L01 module, which from previous posts we have seen can easily be sniffed and decoded with an RTL-SDR or other SDR.

To reverse engineer the drones wireless communications system the teams used software defined radios like the HackRF and BladeRF, and also an alternative method involving just using an Arduino and nRF24L01+ receiver chip. Once the signal was received, they used GNU Radio to decode the signal into packets of data. After analyzing the data they found that the data bytes were easily reverse engineered and then were able to transmit their own data packets to control the drone. The post goes into further detail on the specifics of the reverse engineering.

The Syma X8C drone to be stolen in the competition.
The Syma X8C drone to be stolen in the competition.

Slovenian University Student & Security Researcher Almost Jailed for Researching TETRA with an RTL-SDR

Dejan Ornig, a 26 year old student at the University of Maribor’s Faculty of Criminal Justice and Security was recently almost jailed for finding a security flaw in Police TETRA communications in his home country of Slovenia. Back in 2013 his University Computer Science class of 25 was assigned a task to research security vulnerabilities in TETRA. TETRA is a RF digital communications protocol often used by authorities due to its ability to be secured via encryption. During his research he used an RTL-SDR and the open source Osmocom TETRA decoder, and discovered a flaw in the Slovenian Police’s TETRA configuration which meant that encrypted communications were often being broadcast in the clear. Translated, Ornig said:

For $20 I bought a DVB-T receiver (RTL-SDR), on the Internet, I have found also freely available and open-source software OsmoCOM. Free access solution for decoding the signal Tetra eighth-tetra is already prepared in advance programming framework based on the platform GNU.

He goes on to say (translated):

I was even more surprised when I found that most users do not have authentication turned on the radio terminal, even though the Ministry of the Interior in the documents and tenders repeatedly wrote to all the radio terminals to access networks using authentication.

Shortly after discovering the flaw, Dejan privately contacted the authorities with his findings. But after two years of repeatedly contacting them and waiting for a fix, Dejan decided to take his story to a local news agency in February 2015. At this point the Slovenian Police became interested in Dejan, and instead of fixing the problem, decided to conduct a search on his house, seizing his computer and RTL-SDR. After the search the Police made life harder for Ornig by trying to lump on other problems. During the search they found a “counterfeit police badge” in his house and apparently accused him of impersonating a police officer, and after a search of his PC they also decided to charge him after finding out that he covertly recorded his ex-employer calling him an “idiot”.

Ornig has now been given a 15 month suspended jail sentence for attempting to “hack” the TETRA network. Fortunately the suspended part means that in order to not go to jail Ornig simply must not repeat his crime again within 3 years. While SDR’s and radios are not illegal in most countries this is a reminder to professional and amateur security researchers to check that what you are doing is legal in your country. Even if it is for the overall good, Police often do not have the technical competence to understand security researchers and may react illogically to findings. The good news about Ornig’s story is that apart from the suspended jail sentence the authorities appear to have now worked with him to fix the problems.

TETRA Decoding
TETRA Decoding

Story Sources:
[http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/researcher-jailed-finding-security-flaws-police-communications-1561600][http://siol.net/novice/slovenija/kako-za-20-evrov-prisluskovati-slovenskim-varnostnim-organom-video-44923][https://podcrto.si/odziv-na-trditve-policije-glede-varnosti-komunikacijskega-sistema-tetra]