Tagged: ads-b

A Portable RTL-SDR Based ADS-B Receiver with Display and 3D Printed Enclosure

Over on Hackaday.io user nathan.matsuda has written about his RTL-SDR based hand held ADS-B aircraft receiver with display and 3D printed enclosure.

His initial idea was to create a flexible and open portable SDR device, however keeping the device open and built for general use meant increased complexity which quickly slowed his progress. Instead [Nathan] decided to focus on just ADS-B for his portable device as living near an airport he’d been interested in aircraft tracking since his first SDR arrived.

The device consists of a Raspberry Zero, RTL-SDR, 3.5″ IPS LCD and a battery pack for portability. For software he uses dump1090 with some custom code for the map plotting. Together with a 3D printed case and some buttons, the result is a very professional looking portable aircraft tracking device.

Hopefully Nathan will continue updating his project page so that others may replicate it on their own.

Raspberry Pi Zero and RTL-SDR Portable ADS-B Receiver
Raspberry Pi Zero and RTL-SDR Portable ADS-B Receiver

RadarBox24 Specialty ADS-B RTL-SDR Reduced to $9.95 + Shipping

RadarBox24.com is a flight data aggregation service similar to sites like FlightAware.com and FlightRadar24.com. They aggregate ADS-B aircraft data obtained from (mostly) volunteer RTL-SDR based feeders based all over the world and use this to power their flight tracking map and flight information database.

Last year RadarBox24 came out with a specialty ADS-B RTL-SDR dongle. This is a custom RTL-SDR which contains a built in 1090 MHz tuned amplifier and filter. We have not tested this dongle yet, but we expect that the design and performance would be very similar to the FlightAware ADS-B dongles. A network analyzer report from RB24 is provided here.

These dongles can only receive 1090 MHz and do so better than a standard RTL-SDR due to the built in LNA and filter. The LNA reduces the noise figure of the dongle leading to greater sensitivity, and the filter removes any strong out of band signals that could overload and desensitize the dongle. This results in greater reception range, and more flights tracked. Please note that these dongles cannot be used as wideband general purpose RTL-SDRs due to the filtering.

Recently in an attempt to gather more volunteer contributors, RadarBox24 has decided to sell their ADS-B dongles at a loss, pricing them at only US$9.95 + shipping (or on Amazon USA with Prime). Shipping appears to be anywhere from US$5-$8 depending where you are in the world, and shipping does not increase with two or more dongles being ordered.

ADS-B data can easily be shared to RadarBox24 with their Raspberry Pi image and RadarBox24 write that if you share data to their site, you will receive the following kickbacks:

  • Free Business Account while sharing (worth $39.95 /mo). This allows you to access RAW and historic flight data as well as enabling other features such as more advanced data filtering, and a weather layer.
  • Strong and enthusiastic Community on Whatsapp
  • Track your own station's flights in real-time not only on website but also on RadarBox apps
RadarBox ADS-B RTL-SDR Dongle
RadarBox ADS-B RTL-SDR Dongle

An Overview of Aircraft Communication Modes from HF to UHF

Over on YouTube icholakov has uploaded an informative video that gives an overview of the main communication modes that aircraft use from HF to UHF. In the video he also gives examples of those modes being received and decoded with an SDR.

The modes that he explains and demonstrates are VHF voice, VHF ATIS automated weather, ACARS short data messages, HF voice, HF automatic weather, HF data selective calling (SELCAL), HF data link (HFDL) and UHF ADS-B aircraft positioning.

Monitoring airplane communications

RadarBox24 Release their XRange RTL-SDR ADS-B Receiver

The team at radarbox24.com recently wrote in and wanted to share some new developments including news about their recently released RadarBox XRange receiver, which is an RTL-SDR based ADS-B receiver. Radarbox24 are an ADS-B aggregation flight tracking website, similar to sites like flightaware.com and flightradar24.com.

The RadarBox XRange receiver costs $649.95 USD and is available on their store. The box appears to include a full computing unit as well as a custom RTL-SDR receiver, and a built in filter and LNA as well. It is sold as a set that includes receiver, power supply, antenna and cabling. Compared to setting up an ADS-B receiver on your own by purchasing an RTL-SDR, ADS-B LNA/Filter, Antenna and Raspberry Pi separately, the XRange is well over three times more expensive. But it may have some value as an easy to set up and ready to go ADS-B receive system. They write:

1- We have release the brand new RadarBox app for iOS and Android where data sharers are able to see what what their own stations receive using the MyStation feature.

2- We've released the brand new RadarBox XRange receiver, RTL SDR based whcih is being sold and placed all over the world to increase network coverage.

3- Our RadarBox24.com flight tracking portal reached 3 millions viewers per month and, together with our apps, is growing really fast by providing an easy way for Raspberry Pi owners or users with our XRange and Micro RadarBox receivers to share flight data with us and benefit from a free Business account.

More information:
- Link to our Store where users can buy the XRange receiver and accessories below:
https://www.radarbox24.com/store

- Link to a real-time listing of newly added stations (Raspberry pi, XRange and all other supported receivers)
https://www.radarbox24.com/stations/new-units

- Link for users to install our software on their Raspberry Pi receivers and start sharing data with us (we get up to 5 new added units added to our network daily):
https://www.radarbox24.com/raspberry-pi

- Link to our worldwide station ranking:
https://www.radarbox24.com/stations

- Link to our MyStation, available to data sharers, where they can monitor their own station aircraft, stats and received aircraft listing:
Example for Texas, US: https://www.radarbox24.com/stations/EXTRPI009148
Example for Sweden: https://www.radarbox24.com/stations/EXTRPI006084
Example for Doha Qatar: https://www.radarbox24.com/stations/PGANRB300567

- The MyStation feature is also available on the Android and iOS apps so users can monitor their stations remotely.

XRange Receiver Set
XRange Receiver Set

Tracking Police and Military Aircraft at the G7 Summit with an RTL-SDR

Back in early 2016 we posted about a journalist who used an RTL-SDR to gather ADS-B data about the type of aircraft used at the world economic forum in Davos. The idea was to help highlight the vast wealth and power of the attendees by showing off their heavy use of private aircraft.

Now more recently Laurent Bastien Corbeil has published a similar article in Motherboard (a Vice News tech magazine) explaining how he tracked police and military planes at this years G7 summit which was held in Canada in early June. Laurent used an RTL-SDR Blog V3 with the small dipole antenna attached to a window to gather ADS-B data from all the aircraft activity during the summit.

ADS-B is a radio system used on modern aircraft which broadcasts the aircraft's current GPS location and other data such as aircraft identifiers. It is now used extensively by air traffic controllers as it is significantly more reliable than traditional radar. With a simple RTL-SDR it is possible for anyone to track and plot ADS-B data on a map, and this is how tracking sites like flightradar24.com and flightaware.com work.

From his collected data he was able to spot several interesting aircraft such as Canadian Air Force Chinooks, C130 Hercules', RCMP Pilatus', a military Bombardier jet, and a coast guard Bell 427. He also notes that while he was able to spot Donald Trumps Marine One helicopter with his own eyes, the ADS-B data was not present, indicating that more important military aircraft do not broadcast ADS-B for security reasons.

In the article Laurent makes estimates of the costs of operating these aircraft, and makes some guesses on the type of mission flown by some of the aircraft.

G7 Aircraft Flight Costs (Data by Laurent Bastien Corbeil, Graphics by Marvin Lau)
G7 Aircraft Flight Costs (Data by Laurent Bastien Corbeil, Graphics by Marvin Lau)

Tracking Planes with RTL-SDR, Apache Kafka, KSQL, Kibana and a Raspberry Pi

Inspired by a low flying aircraft that kept waking his cat in the morning, Simon Aubury decided to use an RTL-SDR and ADS-B tracking software dump1090 to determine which plane was the culprit. This is all now standard stuff, however, Simon's software implementation and management of the received ADS-B data is quite unique, as he uses Apache Kafka, KSQL and Kibana as his tools for processing and visualizing the ADS-B data.

Apache Kafka is a 'distributed streaming platform', and KSQL enables real time processing of the data from Kafka. Kibana is a data visualization tool. Essentially these technologies are just ways to manage, process and digest in a human readable way large amounts of real time data coming into a database.

So with some clever database coding Simon was able to create a constantly updating dashboard in Kibana that plots aircraft positional heat maps, displays data such as spotted airlines and destination frequencies in a text cloud, and displays aircraft height data in a line graph. Finally using a database lookup and his gathered data Simon was able to determine that an A380 aircraft flying over his house was waking his cat in the morning.

Getting the V3 Bias Tee to Activate on PiAware ADS-B Images

A few owners of our RTL-SDR V3 and/or our Triple Filtered ADS-B LNA (or other bias tee powered LNAs) have been having trouble getting the V3 bias tee to activate on the FlightAware PiAware Raspberry Pi image. The core stumbling point is that the PiAware image activates the dump1090 ADS-B decoder immediately upon boot. To activate the bias tee, the bias tee software requires access to the dongle which it cannot get since dump1090 is blocking it. So to get around this the bias tee must be activated first before dump1090 runs.

PiAware is FlightAware's Raspberry Pi image which feeds their flightaware.com flight tracking service using RTL-SDR dongles. By using our Triple Filtered ADS-B LNA, users can expect increased range and decoded messages, especially when using long runs of coax cable, and/or in environments with strong interfering signals.

In the instructions below we'll explain how to set up a PiAware image that automatically enables the Bias Tee upon boot.

Downloading the V3 Bias Tee Software onto PiAware

First we assume that you're starting fresh from a new PiAware image, so we need to enable WiFi and SSH connections which is part of the standard set up for PiAware. See the following links for instructions.

Enable WiFi via config file https://flightaware.com/adsb/piaware/build

Enable SSH by adding ssh file to boot https://flightaware.com/adsb/piaware/build/optional#password

 
Now log in to your PiAware machine using SSH and PuTTY (or any other terminal software) using username "pi" and password "flightaware".

Run the following commands to update and install some dependencies. 

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install git cmake build-essential libusb-1.0-0-dev

 
Download and install the RTL-SDR V3 Bias Tee software.

cd ~
git clone https://github.com/rtlsdrblog/rtl_biast
cd rtl_biast
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
make

Testing the Bias Tee

Over on his blog Akos has created a short guide to activating the bias tee manually, by first stopping dump1090, activating the bias tee, then restarting dump1090. It's a simple one line copy and paste job.

So after installing the rtl_biast software above you can use the following line to test the bias tee. After running this line the FlightAware service should be up and running again, with the bias tee and LNA activated.

sudo service dump1090-fa stop && cd ~/rtl_biast/build/src && ./rtl_biast -b 1 && sudo service dump1090-fa start

Automatically Starting the Bias Tee on Boot

Ideally we don't want to have to reactivate the bias tee manually every time the Raspberry Pi reboots. To make it automatic use the following instructions:

First create a service directory and configuration file

sudo mkdir /etc/systemd/system/dump1090-fa.service.d
sudo nano /etc/systemd/system/dump1090-fa.service.d/bias-t.conf

 
Then paste in the following

[Service]
ExecStartPre=/home/pi/rtl_biast/build/src/rtl_biast -b 1

 
Finally press Ctrl+X then Y to close and save. Now whenever PiAware reboots the bias tee should be automatically activated as this service runs before dump1090 is activated.

Credits:

Thanks to the discussion on the FlightAware forums and in particular user 'obj' for originally finding this automatic solution.

Tysonpower Reviews our Triple Filter ADS-B LNA

Thank you to YouTuber 'Tysonpower' who is known for making various RF related videos as he has recently reviewed our Triple Filtered ADS-B LNA on his blog and on YouTube. Note that his video is in German, but it contains English subtitles. In the review he compares our LNA against a more expensive ADS-B LNA and found that it performs just as good, if not better in some cases. 

Our ADS-B LNA uses a triple filter design, as well as a two stage LNA which aims to significantly cut out interference from out of band signals which could overload the LNA and/or SDR dongle. It also has a low noise figure and high output gain of 27dB which is great for reducing losses on long runs of coax cable. More information about our LNA on the release post, and it can be purchased from our store.

[EN subs] Top ADSB LNA für nur 25€ - RTL-SDR Blog LNA