Tagged: gqrx

YouTube Guide: Installing GQRX on Windows 10

GQRX is a general purpose GUI based SDR program that is typically used most often on Linux and Mac computers, however it is still possible to install and use it on Windows. Over on YouTube M Khanfar has uploaded a tutorial video that shows a step by step guide on how to get GQRX running on Windows 10.

The process is a little long as it involves an install of Windows GNU Radio, Python, pip and various Python dependencies required by GQRX, as well as setting up the Windows PATH. If you prefer a text guide, the full tutorial is also typed out in the YouTube video description.

GNU Radio , GQRX in Win10 installation Guide

Easily Streaming SDR Output Audio through a Network to an Android Phone

Thank you to M Khanfar for submitting another video where he demonstrates and explains how to easily send audio from your Linux PC over to an Android phone. This can be used to monitor the audio output of SDR programs like OP25 and GQRX remotely. The main piece of software used in his setup is the SoundWire Server and SoundWire Android App. SoundWire is described below:

Turn your Android device into wireless headphones / wireless speaker. Stream any music or audio from your PC to your Android phone, tablet, or other PCs. SoundWire does audio mirroring (audio cast). You can use any music player on your PC or laptop like Spotify, YouTube, or iTunes and stream low-latency live sound over WiFi directly to your Android device. Also works over 3G/4G cell networks or WAN.

M Khanfar's full tutorial on how to setup SoundWire can be found in the description of the video.

Piping Op25-GQRX Audio Through LAN to Android Phone

GQRX Updates: GR3.8, New Color Maps, Bug and Performance Fixes

Since mid-January 2020 the popular Linux and Mac compatible SDR program GQRX has seen a number of new code commits over on it's git repository. Some of the updates include moving to GNU Radio 3.8, new color maps, as well as various bug and performance fixes.

At the moment these updates only appear to be available on the latest git code, so to get them you'll need to install GQRX from source via the instructions on the git readme.

Also thank you to @devnulling for providing us with the screenshot posted below which shows off the various new color maps available for the FFT waterfall.

GQRX Updated Color Schemes
GQRX Updated Color Maps

Using Windows Subsystem For Linux (WSL) to Run Linux SDR Programs on Windows 10

Thank you to Happysat who has shared with us a useful tutorial that explains how we can run Linux only SDR programs on a Windows 10 system using the Windows Subsystem For Linux (WSL) feature. WSL is a feature available on Windows 10 which is a Linux compatibility layer designed for running Linux binaries natively on Windows 10. This means that no Virtual Machine with shared resources is required, instead the full resources of your system are available. 

Happysat writes:

Many people using Windows 10 now since Windows 7 is EOL, and WSL is part of the system kinda "free" so why not use it :)

Together with a X-Server and and Desktop like XFCE4, it can be great for running SDR applications in Linux thru rtl_tcp.

Very fast startup in seconds and not much packet loss thru tcp, quite alot linux sdr applications are working very good.

No allocating resources like a VM.

Sometimes better then Ubuntu on a VM.

Software tested: AX-25 Packet Radio, Dab Radio, DSD, Es-Hail Beacon Tracker, Sat Tracking with Gpredict and Gqrx, NOAA Reception WxToImg, Radiosonde Decoding, Shortwave Reception and some more tips and tricks about WSl and SDR.

The steps appear to be fairly simple. Just enable WSL in the Windows 10 Features panel, download a Linux distro built for WSL and run the .exe file. Then you'll have access to a Linux terminal where you can install a GUI desktop environment, the RTL-SDR drivers, and other Linux SDR programs. Happysats tutorial shows how to install and use various Linux programs via WSL.

It seems that the RTL-SDR cannot be directly accessed via the USB in WSL, however, by the workaround is to simply run rtl_tcp in your Windows environment, and connect to the local IP in the Linux environment. This means that only programs that accept rtl_tcp as an input, or demodulated audio from a program like GQRX can be used.

GQRX Running on Windows 10 via WSL
GQRX Running on Windows 10 via WSL

Running GQRX Smoothly on an Intel Compute Stick with a Custom Linux Kernel

Thank you to M Khanfar for submitting news about his custom Linux kernel which allows an RTL-SDR and GQRX to run smoothly and with sound on an Intel Compute Stick. The Intel Compute Stick is a full dongle based computer the size of a pack of gum with pricing that starts from US$120. It has a Quad Core Atom Processor, 2GB RAM, 32 GB of built in storage and an HDMI out port. By default the stick comes with Windows 10 installed, but M Khanfar notes that it is very sluggish.

Instead of the sluggish Windows 10 OS, M Khanfar decided that he wanted to run Ubuntu Linux instead. However he found that the standard Ubuntu image did not have support for audio over HDMI or WiFi on the Compute stick. So he built his own custom kernel with some patches to fix this issue. With the issue fixed, GQRX with an RTL-SDR now runs smoothly with full audio support, and rtl_tcp can also be run over WiFi.

M Khanfar has uploaded the patched ISO to his Google Drive here.

Update 29 January 2019: M Khanfar has updated us and noted that CubicSDR now works on the custom kernel too, and he has provided full installation instructions here. A video showing it in action can be seen on YouTube.

GQRX under Custom Kernel-Intel Computer Stick

GQRX and gr-osmosdr now with support for SpyServer

Thanks to the work of Lucas Teske, GQRX is now able to connect to SpyServer servers. SpyServer is the IQ streaming server software solution developed by the Airspy SDR developers. It can support Airspy and RTL-SDR devices, and can be used to access these SDRs remotely over a network connection. It is similar to rtl_tcp, but a lot more efficient in terms of network usage, meaning that it performs well over an internet connection. On a previous post we have a tutorial about setting up a SpyServer with an RTL-SDR.

The code modified by Lucas is the gr-osmosdr module, and Lucas' code can be downloaded from his GitHub at github.com/racerxdl/gr-osmosdr. It doesn't yet appear to have been merged into the official osmocom branch. The gr-osmosdr module is a generic block used to access various SDR hardware, so any software that utilizes it (such as GNU Radio) should be able to connect to a SpyServer connection too.

Talks from the AMSAT-UK RSGB 2017 Convention

The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) and AMSAT-UK recently presented a number of talks at their latest convention held in October of this year. Some of the talks are SDR related and are interesting for those interested in satellite reception. A couple of interesting SDR related talks are presented below, and the rest of the talks can be accessed on their YouTube page.

Software defined radio for the satellite geek - Alex Csete OZ9AEC

In this talk Alex Csete (Oz9AEC) who is the programmer behind the popular GQRX software that is often used with RTL-SDRs discusses his latest work and some of his experiences with writing software for SDRs.

2017: Software defined radio for the satellite geek - Alex Csete OZ9AEC

Going to space the libre way - Pierros Papadeas, Libre Space Foundation

In this talk Pierros Papadeas who is the founder of the Libre Space Foundation discusses their SatNOGS project. SatNOGS is a project that uses RTL-SDRs in custom 3D printed home made satellite tracking ground stations. It aims to enable easy access to live satellite data online by significantly increasing ground station coverage.

2017: Going to space the libre way - Pierros Papadeas, Libre Space Foundation

ADALM-PLUTO SDR Hack: Tune 70 MHz to 6 GHz and GQRX Install

Yesterday we posted an unboxing and a few tests with the PlutoSDR. On that post user rlwsdr commented and informed us that’s it’s actually possible to do a quick hack that changes the frequency range and bandwidth from 325 – 3800 MHz and 20 MHz up to 70 MHz to 6000 MHz and 56 MHz bandwidth. All that is needed to perform this hack is setting a device string on the PlutoSDR via a USB serial connection. This hack has been confirmed by Alex Csete and others on Twitter and ourselves. It works for both RX and TX.

Alexander Csete (programmer of GQRX) also posted instructions in a comment on our last post that explained how to get GQRX running with the PlutoSDR. 

Also in the last post we mentioned that all distributors were out of stock, but a few hours after that post went out Digikey restocked and they now have (at the time of this post) 184 units left at the $99 USD price.

Frequency and Bandwidth Hack

Thanks to ‘rlwsdr’ and Alexandru Csete for bringing attention to this hack.

It seems that the current shipping version of the PlutoSDR uses the AD9363 chip which is restricted to a frequency range of 325 – 3800 MHz and bandwidth of 20 MHz. However, the higher end AD9364 chip which can support 70 MHz to 6000 MHz and 56 MHz of bandwidth is supposedly nearly identical to the AD9363 chip. The PlutoSDR can be tricked into seeing a AD9364 chip simply by changing a device string on the unit, but it’s not guaranteed to give the full tuning range and bandwidth for every single unit. It’s possible that the AD9363 chips are actually AD9364 chips that failed performance QC checks and have just been rebranded as a lower end model, or that a cheaper silicon process is used with the lower end chip.

The instructions for performing this hack are actually detailed by the official Analog.com PlutoSDR wiki on the customization page. Just search for the heading “Updating to the AD9364”. The instructions state that this is only for older PlutoSDR units which actually came with the AD9364 chip, but it seems to work with the newer PlutoSDR units that have the AD9363 chips as well.

Simply plug the PlutoSDR in, and connect to it via a serial connection. On Windows you can use a program like PuTTY for this purpose. First search in device manager for the COM port assigned to your PlutoSDR, and then input this into PuTTY leaving the speed at 9600. You can then log in and set the environment variables using the lines provided in the wiki. Now in GNU Radio, GQRX etc you should be able to tune down to 70 MHz and up to 6 GHz and set the bandwidth to 56 MHz.

PlutoSDR Upgrade instructions
PlutoSDR Upgrade instructions

The images below show the PlutoSDR serial connection screen and the commands you need to type, the PlutoSDR tuning down to broadcast FM frequencies at 100 MHz, and a TX test at 70.1 MHz. It was found that the strength of the TX is a bit lower outside the official range, but can be increased by turning off the attenuation setting.

Setting up the GQRX Experimental Branch for the PlutoSDR

First set up GNU Radio and gr-iio using the instructions from this Reddit thread.

Now install gr-osmosdr-gqrx with the iiodev branch.

git clone https://github.com/csete/gr-osmosdr-gqrx
cd gr-osmosdr-gqrx/
git checkout plutosdr
mkdir build
cd build/
cmake ../
make
sudo make install
sudo ldconfig

Install the GQRX prerequisites

sudo apt-get install git build-essential cmake qtbase5-dev qt5-default qtscript5-dev libssl-dev qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools qtmultimedia5-dev libqt5svg5-dev libqt5webkit5-dev libsdl2-dev libasound2 libxmu-dev libxi-dev freeglut3-dev libasound2-dev libjack-jackd2-dev libxrandr-dev libqt5xmlpatterns5-dev libqt5xmlpatterns5 libqt5xmlpatterns5-private-dev pulseaudio

Install GQRX

git clone https://github.com/csete/gqrx.git gqrx.git
cd gqrx.git
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install

Now GQRX should be ready to use the PlutoSDR. In the GQRX confiuguration screen select the device as Other or PlutoSDR and set the device string as “plutosdr=0”. Then you can set your sample rate and RF bandwidth, decimation etc. If you’ve done the frequency range hack then remember to select “No limits” in GQRX so that you can actually tune down further.

Note that in VMWare Lubuntu we were only able to get stable audio from the PlutoSDR and GQRX at a maximum of 3 MHz. Anywhere between 3 – 60 MHz bandwidth the PlutoSDR and GQRX spectrum and waterfall runs smoothly, but the audio is crackly. Might be a VMWare problem, or maybe something that can be fixed in later GQRX releases.

We also tested the PlutoSDR together with the SpyVerter upconverter for HF reception. It seemed to work well.

The images below show the PlutoSDR working in GQRX. The images of the 2.4 GHz and 1.8 GHz bands show that there is little to no attenuation at the edges of the 60 MHz bandwidth, so the upgrade from 20 MHz to 60 MHz is working well.

900 MHz GSM Band
Broadcast FM
1800 MHz Cellular
2.4 GHz WiFi
PlutoSDR + SpyVerter Receiving Broadcast AM
900 MHz GSM Band Broadcast FM 1800 MHz Cellular 2.4 GHz WiFi PlutoSDR + SpyVerter Receiving Broadcast AM

Conclusion

So with this hack the PlutoSDR is a much nicer unit that really makes an interesting and affordable choice for those wanting to upgrade from the RTL-SDR. Combined with a SpyVerter upconverter the unit should also be able to receive HF signals quite easily, so this gives a total cost of $148 for a DC to 6 GHz receiving system with TX capability, 12-bit ADC resolution and up to 56 MHz of bandwidth.

Of course we still need to confirm what the performance of the unit is like, especially in the frequency ranges opened up by the hacks and in regards to strong signal handling. We will test those in the coming weeks. If it handles those well and other software developers support it in their software then despite the unit being advertised as a learning module for students, it might become one of the best and most affordable general purpose SDRs available.

YouTube Guide: Installing GQRX on Windows 10

GQRX is a general purpose GUI based SDR program that is typically used most often on Linux and Mac computers, however it is still possible to install and use it on Windows. Over on YouTube M Khanfar has uploaded a tutorial video that shows a step by step guide on how to get GQRX running on Windows 10.

The process is a little long as it involves an install of Windows GNU Radio, Python, pip and various Python dependencies required by GQRX, as well as setting up the Windows PATH. If you prefer a text guide, the full tutorial is also typed out in the YouTube video description.

GNU Radio , GQRX in Win10 installation Guide

Easily Streaming SDR Output Audio through a Network to an Android Phone

Thank you to M Khanfar for submitting another video where he demonstrates and explains how to easily send audio from your Linux PC over to an Android phone. This can be used to monitor the audio output of SDR programs like OP25 and GQRX remotely. The main piece of software used in his setup is the SoundWire Server and SoundWire Android App. SoundWire is described below:

Turn your Android device into wireless headphones / wireless speaker. Stream any music or audio from your PC to your Android phone, tablet, or other PCs. SoundWire does audio mirroring (audio cast). You can use any music player on your PC or laptop like Spotify, YouTube, or iTunes and stream low-latency live sound over WiFi directly to your Android device. Also works over 3G/4G cell networks or WAN.

M Khanfar's full tutorial on how to setup SoundWire can be found in the description of the video.

Piping Op25-GQRX Audio Through LAN to Android Phone

GQRX Updates: GR3.8, New Color Maps, Bug and Performance Fixes

Since mid-January 2020 the popular Linux and Mac compatible SDR program GQRX has seen a number of new code commits over on it's git repository. Some of the updates include moving to GNU Radio 3.8, new color maps, as well as various bug and performance fixes.

At the moment these updates only appear to be available on the latest git code, so to get them you'll need to install GQRX from source via the instructions on the git readme.

Also thank you to @devnulling for providing us with the screenshot posted below which shows off the various new color maps available for the FFT waterfall.

GQRX Updated Color Schemes
GQRX Updated Color Maps

Using Windows Subsystem For Linux (WSL) to Run Linux SDR Programs on Windows 10

Thank you to Happysat who has shared with us a useful tutorial that explains how we can run Linux only SDR programs on a Windows 10 system using the Windows Subsystem For Linux (WSL) feature. WSL is a feature available on Windows 10 which is a Linux compatibility layer designed for running Linux binaries natively on Windows 10. This means that no Virtual Machine with shared resources is required, instead the full resources of your system are available. 

Happysat writes:

Many people using Windows 10 now since Windows 7 is EOL, and WSL is part of the system kinda "free" so why not use it :)

Together with a X-Server and and Desktop like XFCE4, it can be great for running SDR applications in Linux thru rtl_tcp.

Very fast startup in seconds and not much packet loss thru tcp, quite alot linux sdr applications are working very good.

No allocating resources like a VM.

Sometimes better then Ubuntu on a VM.

Software tested: AX-25 Packet Radio, Dab Radio, DSD, Es-Hail Beacon Tracker, Sat Tracking with Gpredict and Gqrx, NOAA Reception WxToImg, Radiosonde Decoding, Shortwave Reception and some more tips and tricks about WSl and SDR.

The steps appear to be fairly simple. Just enable WSL in the Windows 10 Features panel, download a Linux distro built for WSL and run the .exe file. Then you'll have access to a Linux terminal where you can install a GUI desktop environment, the RTL-SDR drivers, and other Linux SDR programs. Happysats tutorial shows how to install and use various Linux programs via WSL.

It seems that the RTL-SDR cannot be directly accessed via the USB in WSL, however, by the workaround is to simply run rtl_tcp in your Windows environment, and connect to the local IP in the Linux environment. This means that only programs that accept rtl_tcp as an input, or demodulated audio from a program like GQRX can be used.

GQRX Running on Windows 10 via WSL
GQRX Running on Windows 10 via WSL

Running GQRX Smoothly on an Intel Compute Stick with a Custom Linux Kernel

Thank you to M Khanfar for submitting news about his custom Linux kernel which allows an RTL-SDR and GQRX to run smoothly and with sound on an Intel Compute Stick. The Intel Compute Stick is a full dongle based computer the size of a pack of gum with pricing that starts from US$120. It has a Quad Core Atom Processor, 2GB RAM, 32 GB of built in storage and an HDMI out port. By default the stick comes with Windows 10 installed, but M Khanfar notes that it is very sluggish.

Instead of the sluggish Windows 10 OS, M Khanfar decided that he wanted to run Ubuntu Linux instead. However he found that the standard Ubuntu image did not have support for audio over HDMI or WiFi on the Compute stick. So he built his own custom kernel with some patches to fix this issue. With the issue fixed, GQRX with an RTL-SDR now runs smoothly with full audio support, and rtl_tcp can also be run over WiFi.

M Khanfar has uploaded the patched ISO to his Google Drive here.

Update 29 January 2019: M Khanfar has updated us and noted that CubicSDR now works on the custom kernel too, and he has provided full installation instructions here. A video showing it in action can be seen on YouTube.

GQRX under Custom Kernel-Intel Computer Stick

GQRX and gr-osmosdr now with support for SpyServer

Thanks to the work of Lucas Teske, GQRX is now able to connect to SpyServer servers. SpyServer is the IQ streaming server software solution developed by the Airspy SDR developers. It can support Airspy and RTL-SDR devices, and can be used to access these SDRs remotely over a network connection. It is similar to rtl_tcp, but a lot more efficient in terms of network usage, meaning that it performs well over an internet connection. On a previous post we have a tutorial about setting up a SpyServer with an RTL-SDR.

The code modified by Lucas is the gr-osmosdr module, and Lucas' code can be downloaded from his GitHub at github.com/racerxdl/gr-osmosdr. It doesn't yet appear to have been merged into the official osmocom branch. The gr-osmosdr module is a generic block used to access various SDR hardware, so any software that utilizes it (such as GNU Radio) should be able to connect to a SpyServer connection too.

Talks from the AMSAT-UK RSGB 2017 Convention

The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) and AMSAT-UK recently presented a number of talks at their latest convention held in October of this year. Some of the talks are SDR related and are interesting for those interested in satellite reception. A couple of interesting SDR related talks are presented below, and the rest of the talks can be accessed on their YouTube page.

Software defined radio for the satellite geek - Alex Csete OZ9AEC

In this talk Alex Csete (Oz9AEC) who is the programmer behind the popular GQRX software that is often used with RTL-SDRs discusses his latest work and some of his experiences with writing software for SDRs.

2017: Software defined radio for the satellite geek - Alex Csete OZ9AEC

Going to space the libre way - Pierros Papadeas, Libre Space Foundation

In this talk Pierros Papadeas who is the founder of the Libre Space Foundation discusses their SatNOGS project. SatNOGS is a project that uses RTL-SDRs in custom 3D printed home made satellite tracking ground stations. It aims to enable easy access to live satellite data online by significantly increasing ground station coverage.

2017: Going to space the libre way - Pierros Papadeas, Libre Space Foundation

ADALM-PLUTO SDR Hack: Tune 70 MHz to 6 GHz and GQRX Install

Yesterday we posted an unboxing and a few tests with the PlutoSDR. On that post user rlwsdr commented and informed us that’s it’s actually possible to do a quick hack that changes the frequency range and bandwidth from 325 – 3800 MHz and 20 MHz up to 70 MHz to 6000 MHz and 56 MHz bandwidth. All that is needed to perform this hack is setting a device string on the PlutoSDR via a USB serial connection. This hack has been confirmed by Alex Csete and others on Twitter and ourselves. It works for both RX and TX.

Alexander Csete (programmer of GQRX) also posted instructions in a comment on our last post that explained how to get GQRX running with the PlutoSDR. 

Also in the last post we mentioned that all distributors were out of stock, but a few hours after that post went out Digikey restocked and they now have (at the time of this post) 184 units left at the $99 USD price.

Frequency and Bandwidth Hack

Thanks to ‘rlwsdr’ and Alexandru Csete for bringing attention to this hack.

It seems that the current shipping version of the PlutoSDR uses the AD9363 chip which is restricted to a frequency range of 325 – 3800 MHz and bandwidth of 20 MHz. However, the higher end AD9364 chip which can support 70 MHz to 6000 MHz and 56 MHz of bandwidth is supposedly nearly identical to the AD9363 chip. The PlutoSDR can be tricked into seeing a AD9364 chip simply by changing a device string on the unit, but it’s not guaranteed to give the full tuning range and bandwidth for every single unit. It’s possible that the AD9363 chips are actually AD9364 chips that failed performance QC checks and have just been rebranded as a lower end model, or that a cheaper silicon process is used with the lower end chip.

The instructions for performing this hack are actually detailed by the official Analog.com PlutoSDR wiki on the customization page. Just search for the heading “Updating to the AD9364”. The instructions state that this is only for older PlutoSDR units which actually came with the AD9364 chip, but it seems to work with the newer PlutoSDR units that have the AD9363 chips as well.

Simply plug the PlutoSDR in, and connect to it via a serial connection. On Windows you can use a program like PuTTY for this purpose. First search in device manager for the COM port assigned to your PlutoSDR, and then input this into PuTTY leaving the speed at 9600. You can then log in and set the environment variables using the lines provided in the wiki. Now in GNU Radio, GQRX etc you should be able to tune down to 70 MHz and up to 6 GHz and set the bandwidth to 56 MHz.

PlutoSDR Upgrade instructions
PlutoSDR Upgrade instructions

The images below show the PlutoSDR serial connection screen and the commands you need to type, the PlutoSDR tuning down to broadcast FM frequencies at 100 MHz, and a TX test at 70.1 MHz. It was found that the strength of the TX is a bit lower outside the official range, but can be increased by turning off the attenuation setting.

Setting up the GQRX Experimental Branch for the PlutoSDR

First set up GNU Radio and gr-iio using the instructions from this Reddit thread.

Now install gr-osmosdr-gqrx with the iiodev branch.

git clone https://github.com/csete/gr-osmosdr-gqrx
cd gr-osmosdr-gqrx/
git checkout plutosdr
mkdir build
cd build/
cmake ../
make
sudo make install
sudo ldconfig

Install the GQRX prerequisites

sudo apt-get install git build-essential cmake qtbase5-dev qt5-default qtscript5-dev libssl-dev qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools qtmultimedia5-dev libqt5svg5-dev libqt5webkit5-dev libsdl2-dev libasound2 libxmu-dev libxi-dev freeglut3-dev libasound2-dev libjack-jackd2-dev libxrandr-dev libqt5xmlpatterns5-dev libqt5xmlpatterns5 libqt5xmlpatterns5-private-dev pulseaudio

Install GQRX

git clone https://github.com/csete/gqrx.git gqrx.git
cd gqrx.git
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install

Now GQRX should be ready to use the PlutoSDR. In the GQRX confiuguration screen select the device as Other or PlutoSDR and set the device string as “plutosdr=0”. Then you can set your sample rate and RF bandwidth, decimation etc. If you’ve done the frequency range hack then remember to select “No limits” in GQRX so that you can actually tune down further.

Note that in VMWare Lubuntu we were only able to get stable audio from the PlutoSDR and GQRX at a maximum of 3 MHz. Anywhere between 3 – 60 MHz bandwidth the PlutoSDR and GQRX spectrum and waterfall runs smoothly, but the audio is crackly. Might be a VMWare problem, or maybe something that can be fixed in later GQRX releases.

We also tested the PlutoSDR together with the SpyVerter upconverter for HF reception. It seemed to work well.

The images below show the PlutoSDR working in GQRX. The images of the 2.4 GHz and 1.8 GHz bands show that there is little to no attenuation at the edges of the 60 MHz bandwidth, so the upgrade from 20 MHz to 60 MHz is working well.

900 MHz GSM Band
Broadcast FM
1800 MHz Cellular
2.4 GHz WiFi
PlutoSDR + SpyVerter Receiving Broadcast AM
900 MHz GSM Band Broadcast FM 1800 MHz Cellular 2.4 GHz WiFi PlutoSDR + SpyVerter Receiving Broadcast AM

Conclusion

So with this hack the PlutoSDR is a much nicer unit that really makes an interesting and affordable choice for those wanting to upgrade from the RTL-SDR. Combined with a SpyVerter upconverter the unit should also be able to receive HF signals quite easily, so this gives a total cost of $148 for a DC to 6 GHz receiving system with TX capability, 12-bit ADC resolution and up to 56 MHz of bandwidth.

Of course we still need to confirm what the performance of the unit is like, especially in the frequency ranges opened up by the hacks and in regards to strong signal handling. We will test those in the coming weeks. If it handles those well and other software developers support it in their software then despite the unit being advertised as a learning module for students, it might become one of the best and most affordable general purpose SDRs available.