Category: Reviews

LimeSDR Unboxing and Initial Review

A few days ago we received our early bird LimeSDR unit from CrowdSupply. The LimeSDR is advertised as an RX/TX capable SDR with a 100 kHz – 3.8 GHz frequency range, 12-bit ADC and up to 80 MHz of bandwidth. Back in June 2016 they surpassed their $500k goal, raising over $800k on the crowdfunding site Crowdsupply. Just recently some of the first crowdfunding backers began to receive their units in the mail. We paid $199 USD for an early bird unit, and currently a preorder unit costs $289 USD on Crowd Supply.

Unboxing

Inside the shipping box is a smaller black and green box with the LimeSDR itself inside, and a short USB pigtail with extra power header. Note that no pigtails for the u.FL antenna connectors are provided, so you will need to source these yourself, but they can be found quite cheaply on Aliexpress.

The PCB itself is intricate and heavily populated with many components. You certainly to feel like you are getting your moneys worth of engineering effort with this SDR. An enclosure is probably highly recommended if you intend to take your LimeSDR out and about, as some of the SMD components look like they could be easily knocked off with a drop.

The parcel was declared at the full value, so this may be a problem for those in countries with low customs tax thresholds.

Driver and Software Installation

For this first initial review we decided to set the LimeSDR up in Windows, with SDR-Console V3, and try to get wideband reception and some simple transmit working.

Installation was a bit rocky. Firstly one criticism is that the online documentation is all over the place, and a lot of it seems to be out of date. It was very difficult to find the current USB drivers as many links redirected to the older drivers. Finally we found drivers that work on the Lime Suite page.

Secondly there have been some apparent changes with hardware revision 1.4 which is shipping to Crowd Supply backers.  This resulted in the current version of SDR-Console V3 being incompatible with the newly shipped boards, and throwing the error “Encountered an improper argument”. We had to search through the LimeSDR forums, and there we found a beta LimeSDR fix version of Console V3 released by Simon. This version worked with our board. 

Once we had the LimeSDR drivers and SDR-Console V3 installed we decided to update the firmware as we’d seen on the forums that the latest firmware supposedly improved a few things. Again, performing this task was quite confusing as there was several links to outdated documentation and software all over the place. Finally we found what we think is the latest instructions, which had us download Lime Suite which comes together with the PothosSDR software. In this version of Lime Suite there is an automatic firmware update option which downloaded and flashed the new firmware easily.

It’s clear that the LimeSDR is very much a development board made mainly for experimenters, but some decent up to date documentation and a quick start guide would help new users tremendously.

Problems with HF and reception below 700 MHz

By browsing the LimeSDR forums we came across a topic where several users had claimed that the LimeSDR v1.4 (the one shipped to CrowdSupply backers) has abysmal HF sensitivity, and poor sensitivity below 700 MHz. 

It seems that this lack of performance is due to the matching circuit which they have implemented. For better impedance matching at frequencies over 700 MHz they added a parallel 8.2 nH inductor. This unfortunately attenuates HF frequencies severely to the point of no reception, and also other frequencies below 700 MHz to some extent. This is a bit troubling as from the very beginning the LimeSDR has been advertised as working down to 100 kHz.

A hardware fix was found by forum user @sdr_research but this only works if you are comfortable taking a soldering iron to the board to remove that inductor. On this official blog post they also mention more fixes (EasyFix1 is the one recommended on the forums) to improve HF performance that include removing more components, and replacing some others. 

The HF fix for the LimeSDR. Remove this inductor.
The HF fix for the LimeSDR. Remove this inductor.

We performed the EasyFix1 mod, which involved removing one inductor on the PCB. Removal was very simple with a soldering iron. Even without a soldering iron it could probably be forcefully removed with some tweezers. After removing that inductor we saw HF spring back into life, with reception working all the way down to the MW broadcast AM band.

LF reception still seems to be a bit weak. We were able to receive an NDB down to about 300 kHz, but very weakly in comparison to other SDRs.

The image below shows the difference in HF reception before and after the mod.

Before and after the mod. Bottom waterfall shows signal levels before the mod, top waterfall shows signal levels after removing the inductor.
Before and after the mod. Bottom waterfall shows signal levels before the inductor mod, top waterfall shows signal levels after removing the inductor.

Fortunately it seems that LimeSDR is trying to make this right, and just today they issued an update that confirms the issue and offers a fix. They are offering an option for unshipped boards to be modified to improve HF performance before they ship out, and a replacement option for those who have already received boards. The deadline for applying for a modification is February 21, 2017.

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LimeSDR Unboxing and Initial Review

A few days ago we received our early bird LimeSDR unit from CrowdSupply. The LimeSDR is advertised as an RX/TX capable SDR with a 100 kHz – 3.8 GHz frequency range, 12-bit ADC and up to 80 MHz of bandwidth. Back in June 2016 they surpassed their $500k goal, raising over $800k on the crowdfunding site Crowdsupply. Just recently some of the first crowdfunding backers began to receive their units in the mail. We paid $199 USD for an early bird unit, and currently a preorder unit costs $289 USD on Crowd Supply.

Unboxing

Inside the shipping box is a smaller black and green box with the LimeSDR itself inside, and a short USB pigtail with extra power header. Note that no pigtails for the u.FL antenna connectors are provided, so you will need to source these yourself, but they can be found quite cheaply on Aliexpress.

The PCB itself is intricate and heavily populated with many components. You certainly to feel like you are getting your moneys worth of engineering effort with this SDR. An enclosure is probably highly recommended if you intend to take your LimeSDR out and about, as some of the SMD components look like they could be easily knocked off with a drop.

The parcel was declared at the full value, so this may be a problem for those in countries with low customs tax thresholds.

Driver and Software Installation

For this first initial review we decided to set the LimeSDR up in Windows, with SDR-Console V3, and try to get wideband reception and some simple transmit working.

Installation was a bit rocky. Firstly one criticism is that the online documentation is all over the place, and a lot of it seems to be out of date. It was very difficult to find the current USB drivers as many links redirected to the older drivers. Finally we found drivers that work on the Lime Suite page.

Secondly there have been some apparent changes with hardware revision 1.4 which is shipping to Crowd Supply backers.  This resulted in the current version of SDR-Console V3 being incompatible with the newly shipped boards, and throwing the error “Encountered an improper argument”. We had to search through the LimeSDR forums, and there we found a beta LimeSDR fix version of Console V3 released by Simon. This version worked with our board. 

Once we had the LimeSDR drivers and SDR-Console V3 installed we decided to update the firmware as we’d seen on the forums that the latest firmware supposedly improved a few things. Again, performing this task was quite confusing as there was several links to outdated documentation and software all over the place. Finally we found what we think is the latest instructions, which had us download Lime Suite which comes together with the PothosSDR software. In this version of Lime Suite there is an automatic firmware update option which downloaded and flashed the new firmware easily.

It’s clear that the LimeSDR is very much a development board made mainly for experimenters, but some decent up to date documentation and a quick start guide would help new users tremendously.

Problems with HF and reception below 700 MHz

By browsing the LimeSDR forums we came across a topic where several users had claimed that the LimeSDR v1.4 (the one shipped to CrowdSupply backers) has abysmal HF sensitivity, and poor sensitivity below 700 MHz. 

It seems that this lack of performance is due to the matching circuit which they have implemented. For better impedance matching at frequencies over 700 MHz they added a parallel 8.2 nH inductor. This unfortunately attenuates HF frequencies severely to the point of no reception, and also other frequencies below 700 MHz to some extent. This is a bit troubling as from the very beginning the LimeSDR has been advertised as working down to 100 kHz.

A hardware fix was found by forum user @sdr_research but this only works if you are comfortable taking a soldering iron to the board to remove that inductor. On this official blog post they also mention more fixes (EasyFix1 is the one recommended on the forums) to improve HF performance that include removing more components, and replacing some others. 

The HF fix for the LimeSDR. Remove this inductor.
The HF fix for the LimeSDR. Remove this inductor.

We performed the EasyFix1 mod, which involved removing one inductor on the PCB. Removal was very simple with a soldering iron. Even without a soldering iron it could probably be forcefully removed with some tweezers. After removing that inductor we saw HF spring back into life, with reception working all the way down to the MW broadcast AM band.

LF reception still seems to be a bit weak. We were able to receive an NDB down to about 300 kHz, but very weakly in comparison to other SDRs.

The image below shows the difference in HF reception before and after the mod.

Before and after the mod. Bottom waterfall shows signal levels before the mod, top waterfall shows signal levels after removing the inductor.
Before and after the mod. Bottom waterfall shows signal levels before the inductor mod, top waterfall shows signal levels after removing the inductor.

Fortunately it seems that LimeSDR is trying to make this right, and just today they issued an update that confirms the issue and offers a fix. They are offering an option for unshipped boards to be modified to improve HF performance before they ship out, and a replacement option for those who have already received boards. The deadline for applying for a modification is February 21, 2017.

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Review of the ThumbNet N3

Back when it was released in November we posted an initial unboxing and initial first impressions review of the ThumbNet N3 RTL-SDR dongle. In this post we continue that review and post a few more in depth results.

The ThumbNet N3 is the latest iteration of ThumbNet redesigned RTL-SDR dongles. It’s main features include a shielded PCB, metal enclosure, F-type connector, Mini-USB connector, all linear power supplies and an external power mode. It is designed specifically to be used in the ThumbNet system, but because they need to order the units in bulk they sell the excess off to other users too on their new site Nongles.com. The N3’s list of features is shown below.

  • Full backward compatibility with existing RTL-SDR dongles and software
  • High stability TCXO (+/-0.5ppm) (ensuring rock-solid stability from start-up and over a wide range of temperatures)
  • Standard R820T2 + RTL2832U (plus 24C02 EEPROM) chipset
  • Improved/enhanced decoupling. (Common-mode choke on USB port)
  • Low-noise, linear only power regulation (separate 1.2v and 3.3v regulators)
  • External DC (+5v, 450mA) supply connector
  • Mini-USB connection (allows easy separation of the RF unit from the noisy PC)
  • F type RF connector (very common and compatible with existing ThumbNet tracking stations)
  • Large (6x4cm) contiguous ground-plane (for better thermal dissipation)
  • Static drain-away resistor on the RF input (1K to ground)
  • All unnecessary parts (IR receiver, high-current LED etc.) eliminated to reduce parts count and noise
  • Circuit board can be mounted into a common 1455 case

ThumbNet/ThumbSat is a company that hopes to help experimenters get mini satellites into orbit starting from $20k USD. The ThumbNet project aims to provide hundreds of schools and educational institutions with RTL-SDR based satellite receivers in the hope that they will use them as an educational resource, and at the same time help set up a worldwide monitoring network, so that the live data from the launched satellites is always available to the satellite experimenters.

The ThumbNet N3
The ThumbNet N3

Click Continue for the rest of the review

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Leif (SM5BSZ) Compares Several HF Receivers

Over on YouTube well known SDR tester Leif (SM5BSZ) has uploaded a video that compares the performance of several HF receivers with two tone tests and real antennas. He compares a Perseus, Airspy + SpyVerter, BladeRF + B200, BladeRF with direct ADC input, Soft66RTL and finally a ham-it-up + RTLSDR. The Perseus is a $900 USD high end HF receiver, whilst the other receivers are more affordable multi purpose SDRs.

If you are interested in only the discussion and results then you can skip to the following points:

24:06 – Two tone test @ 20 kHz. These test for dynamic range. The ranking from best to worst is Perseus, Airspy + SpyVerter, Ham-it-up + RTLSDR, Soft66RTL, BladeRF ADC, BladeRF + B200. The Perseus is shown to be significantly better than all the other radios in terms of dynamic range. However Leif notes that dynamic range on HF is no longer as important as it once was in the past, as 1) the average noise floor is now about 10dB higher due to many modern electronic interferers, and 2) there has been a reduction in the number of very strong transmitters due to reduced interest in HF. Thus even though the Perseus is significantly better, the other receivers are still not useless as dynamic range requirements have reduced by about 20dB overall.

33:30 – Two tone test @ 200 kHz. Now the ranking is Perseus, Airspy + SpyVerter, Soft66RTL, BladeRF+B200, Ham-it-up + RTLSDR, BladeRF ADC.

38:30 – Two tone test @ 1 MHz. The ranking is Perseus, Airspy + SpyVerter, BladeRF + B200, ham-it-up + RTLSDR, Soft66RTL, bladeRF ADC. 

50:40 – Real antenna night time SNR test @ 14 MHz. Since the Perseus is know to be the best, here Leif uses it as the reference and compares it against the other receivers. The ranking from best to worst is Airspy + SpyVerter, ham-it-up + RTLSDR, BladeRF B200, Soft66RTL, BladeRF ADC. The top three units have similar performance. Leif notes that the upconverter in the Soft66RTL seems to saturate easily in the presence of strong signals.

1:13:30 – Real antenna SNR ranking for Day and Night tests @ 14 MHz. Again with the Perseus as the reference. Ranking is the same as in 3).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BO419G5Lys

In a previous video Leif also uploaded a quick video showing why he has excluded the DX patrol receiver from his comparisons. He writes that the DX patrol suffers from high levels of USB noise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khhyd8-wWEE

Our Quick Review of the ThumbNet N3 Prototype

Earlier this month Akos from the RTLSDR4Everyone blog reviewed a prototype of the latest ThumbNet N3 RTL-SDR. In this post we will also give a quick review of a prototype of their new unit which was kindly provided to us by ThumbNet. ThumbNet is a company that is hoping to provide low cost satellite deployments, and make use of volunteers around the world with RTL-SDR’s to help track them. The RTL-SDR’s and antenna kits are provided to schools and educational institutions for free by ThumbNet, in exchange for students setting up and monitoring a satellite tracking station.

To help with the needs of their project they have designed and manufactured the ThumbNet N3, which is a redesigned RTL-SDR dongle. As they must order in bulk, they are also selling surplus units to the RTL-SDR community with the hope that any profits will help fundraise for other related projects.

The ThumbNet N3 is a redesigned RTL-SDR with a focus on lowering the noise floor and spurs for optimal reception of their satellites. The N3 uses a 0.5 PPM TCXO for low frequency drift and a common mode USB choke for reduced USB noise. The PCB size is also increased allowing for better thermal dissipation. Since F-type is more common in the areas they intend to donate the units to, an F-type antenna connector is used on the dongle. A full list of the changes and improvements they’ve made can be found on their N3 details page.

One way in which they have reduced the noise is by disabling the internal switching voltage regulator within the dongle, and instead using a linear regulator. Linear regulators are much quieter than their switching counterparts, however they do draw significantly more power. The N3 draws 450mA of current, wheras a standard RTL-SDR draws closer to 270mA. Since many USB ports have a 500 mA limit this gets close to problematic to run directly from the USB port. To get around this, the N3 has an external power port, so it can be powered by an AC->DC power pack (like what you use for charging your phone), or more ideally with a quieter linear power supply or batteries. This has the added advantage of avoiding noisy USB power lines.

Review & Testing

The N3 feels very sturdy, and all the connectors are mounted strongly and are unlikely to break off. The top of the receiver shows the power port, the USB port, the shielding can and the F-type connector. The USB connector uses the older depreciated “USB mini” standard (which is different to USB micro found on most phones).

The bottom shows a few components as well as the two linear regulators. In order to power the unit we used an AC to DC 5V power supply (normally used for mobile phone charging) which we soldered on to the bottom of the PCB. Ideally we’d use a battery or linear power supply, but we’ll test that later with the actual production unit.

The standard N3 unit comes with no enclosure or RFI shielding cans (these are paid add-ons). Our prototype unit came with a shielding can covering the components which was enough to block most interfering signals. We did not see many unwanted signals being received with the antenna unplugged which is a good sign that the shielding can is doing its job.

Thumbnet N3 Top
Thumbnet N3 Top
Thumbnet N3 Bottom
Thumbnet N3 Bottom

We gave the unit a quick test on a noise floor scan. The results show that the noise floor has been significantly reduced. The clock spurs are still there but they are reduced in strength vs the standard RTL-SDR.

A standard RTL-SDR vs RTL-SDR Blog V3 vs ThumbNet N3 noise floor scan
A standard RTL-SDR vs RTL-SDR Blog V3 vs ThumbNet N3 noise floor scan

On L-band at around 1.5 GHz the standard RTL-SDR dongles tend to fail at receiving after they heat up a little. The ThumbNet N3 showed no problems in this region, probably thanks to its larger PCB with better heat dissipation.

Conclusion

Once the production model is released we intend to do a more in depth review, but as it stands right now the N3 is looking very good especially for those who use RTL-SDR’s in monitoring applications that can benefit from very low noise floors, or for those who like the idea of being able to externally power the unit.

The ThumbNet N3 can be bought from their store. It costs $25.75 (with no shielding can), $27.75 (with shielding can), $31.50 (with aluminum case and no shielding can) or $33.50 (with aluminum case and shielding can) + $4.50 worldwide shipping. ThumbNet write that initial demand for the N3 unit has been high, so if you are interested in the unit, you need to order early to ensure that you can get one. They are due to ship out by the end of October. We’ve received a note that the delivery date is rescheduled for no later than November 11. 

Also in a recent email from ThumbNet they wrote:

First of all, let me thank you from the whole team, for your support of ThumbNet and helping to promote STEM education around the globe with your purchase. We have sold more of the surplus N3’s than we expected to at this point, so if you have friends that are hesitant, tell them that time is running out! 🙂

Secondly, I wanted to take a moment to update you on the status.

The production run testing of the N3 was completed on time, but testing found three small improvements we could put into effect immediately, to produce a better receiver. Those changes have been submitted to the manufacturer and we are currently waiting for a revised ship date.

We still anticipate that the N3 will ship in the month of October, but I will send a follow up email with a more accurate schedule, when I get one in a day or two, from the manufacturer.

I thank you all for your understanding and patience. All of our testing so far indicates that the N3 is performing very well, and we hope you’ll agree it was worth the wait, when it arrives.

RTLSDR4Everyone: Preliminary Review of the ThumbNet N3 Prototype

A few weeks ago we posted about ThumbNets announcement of their new N3 RTL-SDR dongles. The main theme of their new dongles is lower noise as can be seen by their decision to disable the on board switch mode power supply and add an external power port for powering the dongle from a clean power supply.

Akos from the RTLSDR4Everyone blog received a prototype sample of the N3 for an initial review. In his review he shows some close up shots of the N3 PCB, and does a quick test on receiving some signals. His screenshots show that the noise floor is indeed very low, and that many noisy spurs are eliminated or at least significantly reduced.

Once ThumbNet release their actual commercial units we intend to produce our own review as well.

ThumbSat is a company hoping to enable experimenters to get low cost mini satellites into orbit for about $20k. To support the need for global RX of these satellites they have the ThumbNet project which utilizes RTL-SDR dongles as the receiver. They aim to provide schools and eligible volunteers around the world with free RX hardware to receive and record the data coming from these satellites.

generic_vs_thumbnet
Generic RTL-SDR and the ThumbNet N3

 

New Posts From RTLSDR4Everyone: Avoiding RTL-SDR Ripoffs, ADS-B Antenna Reviews, Travel Kits and Direct Sampling vs Upconverter vs SDRPlay

Akos from the rtlsdr4everyone blog has been busy uploading new posts over the past few days. His first post is part three in a series that discusses how to avoid ripoffs when buying RTL-SDR dongles. The RTL-SDR market has recently become quite saturated, and it is now easy to purchase something that most experienced users would consider a ripoff. His post shows some examples of what he considers to be poor value choices available on eBay.

An example of a ripoff price.
An example of a ripoff price.

His second post discusses his methodology for testing dongles on their ADS-B performance. The second post then leads into the third post in which he compares four antennas on ADS-B reception. He compares two telescopic whip antennas, one set to 1/2 wave length, and the other set to 1/4 wave, a NooElec 5dBi whip antenna, and the FlightAware ADS-B antenna. His results show that the FlightAware antenna was the best performer, followed by the 1/2 wave telescopic whip, then the NooElec 5dBi whip and finally the 1/4 wave telescopic whip. The fourth post continues the ADS-B topic, and he reviews the NooElec 5dBi ADS-B antenna. Although the performance is not as good as the FlightAware antenna he mentions that it is much smaller and great for portable use. If  you are interested, we have also a review of the FlightAware antenna, and we also found its performance to be excellent.

The four ADS-B antennas tested in Akos' review.
The four ADS-B antennas tested in Akos’ review.

In his fifth post Akos shows what his RTL-SDR travel kit consists of. In this post he recommends both our RTL-SDR V3 dongle as well as the NooElec SMArt. For a portable computer, he takes along a Raspberry Pi 3 and a 20,000 mAh battery bank with solar charger. (Though we’d be interested to hear from Akos how long it takes for that small solar panel to charge the battery bank, probably takes days to charge?) For antennas he prefers to take along our large 1.5m telescopic antenna, the NooElec 5dBi ADS-B antenna, a medium telescopic antenna and a Nagoya knock-off telescopic antenna.

Akos' Mobile ADS-B Station.
Akos’ Mobile ADS-B Station.

Finally in the sixth post he shows a video that compares the differences between a generic dongle modded with direct sampling (without any impedance matching circuitry), an RTL-SDR dongle with ham-it-up upconverter and an SDRplay. Unsurprisingly the upconverter and SDRplay performs best.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7qa8nQbIPg

As a bonus, Akos also has done an interesting stress test on the metal case of our RTL-SDR dongles, where he runs it over with a bus to see if it will survive. The case is mangled afterwards, but the dongle and functionality survives!

Dotcom dongle meets a bus

RTLSDR4Everyone: Review of the FlightAware ADS-B RTL-SDR

Akos from the RTLSDR4Everyone blog has recently uploaded a review of the FlightAware ADS-B ProStick RTL-SDR dongle. The FlightAware (FA) dongle is a standard RTL-SDR with SMA connector, but with a very low noise figure LNA built into the front end. This low noise figure helps improve the SNR of ADS-B signals, resulting in more decodes and further range. We previously reviewed the FlightAware dongle in our own review available here.

In his post Akos reviews the FA dongle on its use as a general RTL-SDR as well as an ADS-B receiver. His review is initially critical to some of the misinformed advertising claims made by FA. He then goes on to show some noise floor scans and some ADS-B reception comparisons. Finally he shows some modifications that can be made to improve the cooling of the PCB.

He concludes that the FA ProStick works very well on improving ADS-B performance, but that overloading due to the increased gain is common.

prostickreview_akos2

Review: Outernet LNA and Patch Antenna

Recently we posted news that Outernet had released their 1.5 GHz LNA, Patch Antenna and E4000 Elonics RTL-SDR + E4000/LNA Bundle. When used together, the products can be used to receive the Outernet L-band satellite signal, as well as other decodable L-band satellite signals like AERO and Inmarsat STD-C EGC. Outernet is a new satellite service that aims to be a free “library in the sky”. They continuously broadcast services such as news, weather, videos and other files from satellites.

EDIT: For international buyers the Outernet store has now started selling these products at http://store.outernet.is.

A few days ago we received the LNA and patch antenna for review. The patch antenna is similar to the one we received a while ago when writing our STD-C EGC tutorial, although this one is now slightly larger. It is roughly 12 x 12 cm in size, 100g heavy and comes with about 13 cm of high quality RG316 coax cable with a right angled SMA male connector on the end. The coax cable is clamped on the back for effective strain relief.

The Outernet patch antenna and LNA
The Outernet patch antenna and LNA

The LNA is manufactured by NooElec for Outernet. It amplifies with 34 dB gain from 1525 – 1559 MHz, with its center frequency at 1542 MHz. It must be powered via a 3 – 5.5V bias tee and draws 25 mA. The package consists of a 5 x 2.5 cm PCB board with one female and one male SMA connector. The components are protected by a shielding can. Inside the shielding can we see a MAX12000 LNA chip along with a TA1405A SAW filter. The MAX12000 (datasheet here) is an LNA designed for GPS applications and has a NF of 1 dB. It has a design where there are two amplifiers embedded within the chip, and it allows you to connect a SAW filter in between them. The TA1405A SAW filter appears to be produced by Golledge (datasheet here), and it has about a 3 dB insertion loss.

The Outernet L-Band LNA
The Outernet L-Band LNA
Inside the Outernet LNA
Inside the Outernet LNA

We tested the patch and LNA together with one of our V3 RTL-SDR Blog dongles, with the bias tee turned on. The LNA was connected directly to the dongle, with no coax in between. The patch antenna was angled to point towards the Inmarsat satellite. A 5 meter USB extension cord was then used to interface with a PC. The images below demonstrate the performance we were able to get.

http://Outernet%20Signal

Outernet Signal

http://Outernet%20Signal%20with%204x%20Decimation

Outernet Signal with 4x Decimation

http://AERO

AERO

http://STD-C%20EGC

STD-C EGC

The Outernet team writes that a SNR level of only 2 dB is needed for decoding to work on their signal. With the patch and LNA we were able to get at least 12 dB so this is more than good enough. Other signals such as AERO and STD-C EGC also came in very strongly. Even when not angled at the satellite and placed flat on a table it was able to receive the signal with about 5 dB’s of SNR.

In conclusion the patch and LNA worked very well at receiving the Outernet signal as well as AERO and STD-C EGC. We think these products are great value for money if you are interested in these L-Band signals, and they make it very easy to receive. The only minor problem with the patch antenna is that there is no stand for it, which makes it difficult to mount in a way that faces the satellite. However this issue can easily be fixed with some sellotape and your own mount.

In the future once the Outernet Rpi3 OS and decoder image is released we hope to show a demonstration and tutorial on receiving Outernet data.