Tagged: dragonOS

DragonOS: RF Propagation Analysis with Signal Server GUI

DragonOS is a ready to use Ubuntu Linux image that comes preinstalled with multiple SDR software packages. The creator Aaron also runs a YouTube channel showing how to use the various packages installed. In his latest video Aaron shows how to use the new Signal-Server GUI that has recently been added to DragonOS.

We posted about Signal Server before as it's a very powerful open source tool for creating RF Propagation simulations. With this tool you can determine how a signal from a transmitter might propagate, by taking into account factors like frequency, EIRP, and geographic elevation maps. The resulting propagation map can then be plotted on Google Earth.

Aarons recent work adds thetacoms GUI to the Signal Server install on DragonOS, and his video shows how to use it, including an introduction to RF propagation analysis in general. This version of DragonOS with the GUI is not yet available for download, but it will be in a future version. For now the video also shows how to install the GUI.

DragonOS Focal New Signal Server GUI Setup + Intro to RF Propagation Analysis (Signal-Server) Part 1

SDR Videos from DEFCON 29

Recently some videos from this years (mostly virtual) DEFCON 29 conference have been uploaded to YouTube. Defcon is a major yearly conference all about information security, and some of the talks deal with wireless and SDR topics. Some interesting talks that we've found from the main Defcon and Villages are posted below.

You can view all the talks directly as well as the many others via the main stage DEFCON YouTube channel, the ICS Village Channel, RF Village Channel and the Aerospace Village. There are also several talks from the Ham Radio Village recorded on Twitch. Did we miss any interesting talks? Please let us know in the comments.

Smart Meters: I'm Hacking Infrastructure and So Should You (Hash Salehi)

Why Smart Meters? This is a question Hash is often asked. There's no bitcoin or credit card numbers hiding inside, so he must want to steal power, right? Openly analyzing the technology running our critical infrastructure and publishing the findings is something Hash is passionate about. In the wake of the great Texas freeze of 2021, we can no longer "hope" those in power will make decisions that are in the people's best interest. This talk will present research on the Landis+Gyr GridStream series of smart meters used by Oncor, the largest energy provider in Texas.

Cyber attacks on Industrial Control Systems (ICS) differ in scope and impact based on a number of factors, including the adversary's intent, sophistication and capabilities, and familiarity with ICS and automated indutrial processes. In order to understand, identify and address the specific points that can prevent or stop an attack, a systematic model known as "Cyber Kill Chain" is detailed, a term that comes from the military environment and registered by the Lockheed Martin company. While most are familiar with terms and theoretical diagrams of how security should be implemented, in this talk we want to present live how an attack chain occurs from scratch to compromise industrial devices, the full kill chain, based in our experiences. The goal is to land these threats into the real world without the need to carry out these attacks with a nation-state budget.

Smart Meters: I'm Hacking Infrastructure and So Should You (Hash Salehi)

DEF CON 29 - Paz Hameiri - TEMPEST Radio Station

TEMPEST is a cyber security term that refers to the use of electromagnetic energy emissions generated by electronic devices to leak data out of a target device. The attacks may be passive (where the attacker receives the emissions and recovers the data) or active (where the attacker uses dedicated malware to target and emit specific data).

In this talk I present a new side channel attack that uses GPU memory transfers to emit electromagnetic waves which are then received and processed by the attacker. Software developed for this work encodes audio on one computer and transmits it to the reception equipment positioned fifty feet away. The signals are received and processed and the audio is decoded and played. The maximum bit rate achieved was 33kbit/s and more than 99% of the packets were received.

Frequency selection not only enables maximization of signal quality over distance, but also enables the attacker to receive signals from a specific computer when several computers in the area are active. The software developed demonstrates audio packets transfers, but other types of digital data may be transmitted using the same technique.

[Slides Link] [Whitepaper]

DEF CON 29 - Paz Hameiri - TEMPEST Radio Station

DEF CON 29 RF Village - cemaxecuter - RF Propagation and Visualization with DragonOS

"Today's presentation will start with a brief history of DragonOS, where it started and where it's at today. After a short introduction, I'll dive into the subject of visualizing RF propagation with DragonOS. I'll be showing a fresh OS install and the necessary steps to generate a rough estimate of a transmitter based on SRTM-3 elevation data, as well as a new feature enabling visualization/calculations of the path between transmitter and receiver .

Topics and hands on (pre-recorded) demonstrations will include the following,

  • SPLAT! is an RF Signal Propagation, Loss, And Terrain analysis tool for the electromagnetic spectrum between 20 MHz and 20 GHz.
  • Signal Server Multi-threaded RF coverage calculator
  • Dr. Bill Walker's role
  • Signal Server and DragonOS integration
  • DF-Aggregator Developer / Modifications for visualization

I’ll conclude talking about future improvements to RF propagation and visualization tools."

DEF CON 29 RF Village - cemaxecuter - RF Propagation and Visualization with DragonOS

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DragonOS: Now with RF Propagation and Calculation Tool

DragonOS is a ready to use Ubuntu Linux image that comes preinstalled with multiple SDR software packages. In the recent R14 Preview update, Aaron, the creator of DragonOS has added a new very useful RF propagation and calculation tool. The tool works in conjunction with elevation data to calculate the theoretical signal propagation of a transmitter.

The tool is provided by the open source Signal Server software package, which is based on the original SPLAT! software by John Magliacane (KD2BD). Aaron has also provided a video that demonstrates the software in action, shows how to use it, and explains his future plans for making it easier to use.

This video is a preview of a new RF Propagation and Calculation feature provided by Signal Server. Additionally, custom web server scripts by Dr. Bill Walker, will also be included in DragonOS Focal R14 in the near future. There's a lot of moving parts, but once complete, all you "should" have to do is download, convert, and place the SRTM elevation data for the areas needing coverage calculations in the /usr/src/SDF directory. In the meantime, I'd recommend reading up on all the below material. I've been reading a lot and still don't understand it all!

DragonOS Focal R14 Preview w/ Signal Server + RF Propagation Web Server (SPLAT!, Dr. Bill Walker)

DragonOS: Decoding Iridium Satellites with the Iridium Toolkit and an RTL-SDR

DragonOS is a ready to use Linux OS image that includes various SDR programs preinstalled and ready to use. The creator Aaron also runs a YouTube channel that has multiple tutorial videos demonstrating software built into DragonOS.

In his latest video Aaron explores Iridium reception with an RTL-SDR Blog V3, RTL-SDR Blog Active L-Band Patch Antenna and Iridium Toolkit/gr-iridium. Iridium is a satellite constellation that provides services such as global paging, satellite phones, tracking and fleet management services, as well as services for emergency, aircraft, maritime and covert operations too.

In the video he shows how to edit the config file to turn the bias tee on, how to record Iridium data, how to install the AMBE voice decoder, and finally how to decode the Iridum data with Iridium toolkit and play voice recordings.

DragonOS LTS Decoding Iridium satellites with the Iridium toolkit (gr-iridium, RTL-SDR)

DragonOS: DSP and Signal Analysis with Composable-SDR, Inspectrum and an RTL-SDR

DragonOS is a ready to use Linux OS image that includes various SDR programs preinstalled. The creator Aaron also runs a YouTube channel that contains multiple tutorial videos for DragonOS

One of the latest videos shows us how to use composable-sdr and Inspectrum to capture and analyze signals. Both programs are pre-built into the latest version of DragonOS. Composable-sdr is a set of DSP processing blocks for SDRs embedded in Haskell. One thing it does well is allowing users to easily capture and record demodulated signals for later use via the terminal. Inspectrum is a tool for analysing and reverse engineering signals that have been recorded.

In the video Aaron explores many of the composable-sdr examples discussed on it's GitHub readme page. Including analyzing a wav file recorded with Composable-sdr with Inspectrum and demodulating and recording a wideband FM signal. He also mentions how it's possible to create a PMR446 scanner that records up to 16 channels at once, and how decode helicopter FSK data from audio heard on YouTube (which we mentioned in a previous post).

DragonOS LTS DSP and signal analysis with Composable-SDR + Inspectrum (RTL-SDR)

DragonOS Updated: Now with OP25 Installed and many new YouTube Tutorials

Last month we posted about Aaron's "DragonOS" project, which is a ready to install Linux ISO aimed to make getting started with SDR software easy by providing several programs preinstalled, as well as providing multiple video tutorials. Recently he's updated the build, this time basing it on Lubuntu 18.04 allowing for Legacy and UEFI support, along with disk encryption. The OS supports RTL-SDRs as well as the HackRF and bladeRF and probably supports most other SDRs via the SoapySDR interface.

In terms of software he's also added OP25 and bladeRF support. Other programs pre-installed include rtl_433, Universal Radio Hacker, GNU Radio, Aircrack-ng, GQRX, Kalibrate, hackrf, wireshare, gr-gsm, rtl-sdr, HackRF, IMSI-catcher, Zenmap, inspectrum, qspectrumanalyzer, LTE-Cell-Scanner, CubicSDR, Limesuite, ShinySDR, SDRAngel, SDRTrunk, Kismet, BladeRF.

His DragonOS YouTube tutorial channel is also growing fast, with several tutorials showing you how to use DragonOS to perform tasks like listen to trunked mobile radios, use QSpectrumAnalyzer with a HackRF, receive NOAA APT weather satellite images, retrieve cellular network information via a rooted Samsung Galaxy S5, create a ShinySDR server with rtl_433 and how to capture and replay with a HackRF.

DragonOS running CubicSDR
DragonOS running CubicSDR